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1963 actual

339 28,859

Type of disaster
Storm and floods.
Storm and floods.
Storm and floods.

Storm and floods.
Floods..

Storm and floods.

Storm and floods.
Floods..

Floods and tornadoes..

Floods.

Floods

Chlorine barge.

Storms..

Storms..

Storms and floods. Chlorine barge....

1964 estimate

Selected resources as of June 30 are as follows: Unpaid undelivered orders, 1962, $9.897 thousand (1963 adjustments, $6,992 thousand): 1963, $7.544 thousand; 1964, $7,544 thousand; 1965, $7.544 thousand.

1. Administration.-Funds are provided to administer and coordinate disaster relief assistance for the States. Simultaneously with the President's authorization of an allocation of funds to the Office of Emergency Planning for required disaster assistance, he authorizes an additional allocation to OEP for administrative purposes.

1965 estimate

29,198
4,640

33,838 41,790 19,972

2. Aid to disaster areas.-Under Public Law 81-875, the Federal Government provides supplementary assistance to State and local governments in the event of a declared major disaster. Federal financial assistance is provided from the Disaster Relief appropriation, under which allocations may be made directly to a State, or to Federal agencies as reimbursement for expenditures in disaster relief work performed under this authority. Responsibility for administration of this program is delegated to OEP by Executive Order 10427. The following table summarizes the allocations made. during 1963 (in thousands of dollars):

ALLOCATIONS MADE, 1963

545 41,245

555 19,417

41,790 19,972

-27,065 -25,219 -5,175
-6,992 -1,746 -2,912
8,115

25,219

5,175

25,000

20,000

20,000

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State

Guam
Florida.
Nevada.

Idaho California Oregon. Washington.. West Virginia Kentucky. Virginia

Georgia Tennessee

Hawaii.

Trust Territory. Guam....

ALLOCATIONS MADE, 1963-Continued

Type of disaster
Typhoon Karen
High tides..
Floods

Date declared
Nov. 12, 1962
Dec. 17, 1962
Feb. 14, 1963
Feb. 14, 1963

Feb. 25, 1963

Feb. 25, 1963

Mar. 2.1963 Mar. 13, 1963 Mar. 13, 1963 Mar. 21, 1963 Mar. 26, 1963 Mar. 27, 1963

Apr. 24, 1963

Apr. 30, 1963
Apr. 30,1963

Floods.

Storm and floods. Floods..

Floods..

12

21

Storm and floods.

Storm and floods.

Storm and floods. Storm and floods. Storm and floods. Floods

Typhoon Olive.. Typhoon Olive..

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23

24 Printing and reproduction.....

25 Other services: Services of other agencies.

41

Grants, subsidies, and contributions..

Total obligations.

Personnel Summary

OFFICE OF EMERGENCY PLANNING

Total number of permanent positions..
Full-time equivalent of other positions..
Average number of all employees. -
Employees in permanent positions, end of year.
Employees in other positions, end of
Average GS grade..
Average GS salary

year.

1963

actual

169

70

1

240

15

66

13

5

11.355

22.144

33,838

23

13

29

23

13

11.0 $10,323

1964 estimate

340

44

3

387

28

85

15

5 14,007

27,263

41,790

37

8

44

37

8 10.0 $9,705

Alloc

2.00

1,71

70

25

20

210

500

1,700

2,000

220

75

750

250

1,300 620

37.589

1,128

38,717 -4,879

33,838

1965 estimat

35

39

2

81

19

6,607 12,835

19.972

37 8 44

37

8

10.0 $9,705

ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

Economic assistance is provided to promote economic and social development in less developed areas of the world and to help maintain economic and political stability. Foreign assistance economic programs include development loans and development grants, supporting assistance, voluntary contributions to international organizations, support for the Alliance for Progress, and appropriations for contingencies and other programs such as the investment survey and investment guarantee programs.

ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE-Continued FOREIGN AID (MUTUAL SECURITY)] ASSISTANCE General and special funds:

For expenses necessary to enable the President to carry out the provisions of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, to remain available until June 30, [1964,] 1965, unless otherwise specified herein, as follows: (22 U.S.C. 2151-2406; Foreign Aid and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1964.)

ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

General and special funds:

Development grants: For expenses authorized by section 212, [$155,000,000 $225,000,000 to remain available until expended.

American schools and hospitals abroad: For expenses authorized by section 214 (c), [$14,300,000] $12,000,000.

[American hospitals and schools abroad (special foreign currency program): For expenses authorized by section 214(c), $4,700,000, to be used to purchase foreign currencies which the Treasury Department determines to be excess to the normal requirements of the United States.]

Surveys of investment opportunities: For expenses authorized by section 232, $2,100,000, to remain available until expended.

International organizations and programs: For expenses authorized by section 302, [$116,000,000 $135,600,000.

Supporting assistance: For expenses authorized by section 402, [$330,000,000 $335,000,000.

Contingency fund: For expenses authorized by section 451(a), [$50,000,000 $150,000,000.

[Inter-American social and economic cooperation program: For expenses authorized by section 2 of the Latin American Development Act (74 Stat. 870), as amended, $135,000,000, to remain available until expended.]

Alliance for Progress, development grants: For expenses authorized by section 252, [$80,000,000 $85,000,000, to remain available until expended.

Administrative expenses: For expenses authorized by section 637(a), [$50,000,000 $54,500,000.

Administrative and other expenses: For expenses authorized by section 637(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and by section 305 of the Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act of 1951, as amended, [$2,700,000】 $2,900,000.

Unobligated balances as of June 30, [1963] 1964, of funds heretofore made available under the authority of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, except as otherwise provided by law, are hereby continued available for the fiscal year [1964] 1965, for the same general purposes for which appropriated and amounts certified pursuant to section 1311 of the Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1955, as having been obligated against appropriations heretofore made under the authority of the Mutual Security Act of 1954, as amended, and the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, for the same general purpose as any of the subparagraphs under "Economic Assistance," are hereby continued available for the same period as the respective appropriations in such subparagraphs for the same general purpose [: Provided, That such purpose relates to a project or program previously justified to Congress and the Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate are notified prior to the reobligation of funds for such projects or programs.1. (Foreign Aid and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1964.)

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1. Development grants.-These grants are used in less
developed countries to (1) provide the advisers, teachers,
equipment and supplies required for the improvement of
human resources, especially in administrative, educational,
technical and professional skills; (2) assist in the control
and eradication of major diseases and other menaces to
health; (3) establish and improve institutions which
further economic and social development; (4) assist in
planning and surveys of development programs and
projects; (5) establish or improve basic physical facilities
such as communications and transport, in those relatively
few countries where the economies are unable to carry the
obligations entailed by development loans; (6) pay trans-
portation charges on shipments of supplies by approved
American nonprofit voluntary agencies; and (7) finance
research concerning the problems of economic development.
2 and 3. American schools and hospitals abroad.--To
further the well-rounded training of qualified leadership
in developing countries, the United States has provided
funds to American-sponsored schools and institutions
abroad. The Congress has authorized such assistance
under section 214 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.
In 1964, $19 million was appropriated of which not to
exceed $2.2 million is available for direct dollar costs in
connection with U.S.-founded or sponsored hospitals
abroad and $4.7 million is available solely for payments
in U.S.-owned excess foreign currencies. A total program
of $12 million is proposed in 1965.

4. Surveys of investment opportunities. This program encourages private enterprise to undertake surveys of investment opportunities in the less developed areas of the world. Up to 50% of the total cost of such surveys is paid by AID in the event that the concern sponsoring the survey does not proceed with an investment. If such payment is necessary, the survey becomes AID property for use in attracting other investors.

5. International organizations and programs.--Funds requested under this account are to cover voluntary contributions of the United States to international programs sponsored by an agency of the United Nations as well as regional organizations and special purpose international financial institutions.

Decreases in the amount anticipated to be required for these programs are the result of several factors, most importantly, (1) the major channel of U.S. support of economic assistance to the Congo has been shifted from the multilateral to the bilateral program; (2) several programs, including the NATO science and malaria eradication have been absorbed in the regular assessed programs of the respective organizations, and (3) contributions to regional organizations and to regional programs of international organizations in the fields of economic and technical assistance are included in the estimates for development grants and Alliance for Progress grants. The above decreases are offset by a scheduled increase in our contribution to the Indus Basin Development Fund and an increase in U.S. contributions to the United Nations Expanded Program of Technical Assistance and the Special Fund due to an increase in other member nations' con

tributions.

6. Supporting assistance.-In furtherance of U.S. national security and foreign policy objectives support is provided through this account to countries which need help in maintaining defensive forces or in attaining economic and political stability. Provision is usually

made on a grant basis and, to the extent feasible, suppor ing assistance funds are used for purposes which also co tribute to development. In several cases country situ tions have recently stabilized sufficiently to permit si nificant reductions in supporting assistance and increase concentration on development. Fifty-five percent present supporting assistance requirements are in Kor and Vietnam, countries on the immediate periphery of th Sino-Soviet bloc.

7. Contingencies.-These funds are used to meet urger requirements which cannot be foreseen at the time th budget is prepared. They are available not only t provide emergency assistance in disasters, but also to mee important international situations which create a need fo immediate response in the U.S. national interest.

8. Alliance for Progress.-This account funds technica assistance grants to Latin America as part of the join Alliance for Progress program. The United States also provides assistance under the Alliance through loans, Food for Peace, Peace Corps, Export-Import Bank, and private foundations and institutions.

9. Social Progress Trust Fund. In accordance with an agreement of June 19, 1961, between the United States and the Inter-American Development Bank, the Bank administers a Social Progress Trust Fund, financed by the United States, from which loans and technical assistance grants are made to foster social progress in Latin American countries. An appropriation of $135 million was provided in 1964 to replenish the Fund and to finance activities of the OAS related to the Alliance for Progress. Funds are not advanced to the Bank until needed to meet disbursements from the Fund. Advances to and disbursements by the Fund are as follows (in thousands of dollars and dollar equivalents):

Balance brought forward..
Advances to the Fund..
Collections: Income and loans.............

Total available for disbursement
by the Fund..

Loan disbursements..
Grants and other disbursements..

Balance carried forward.....

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It is anticipated that in 1965, the activities of the Social Progress Trust Fund will be carried on through expanded arrangements to be proposed for the Inter-American Development Bank.

10. Administrative expenses (AID).-These funds are used by the Agency for International Development in Washington and overseas missions to administer economic programs.

11. Administrative and other expenses (State).-Administrative expense funds are requested for the Department of State for support of personnel involved in the administration of the foreign assistance program and of the

Battle Act.

Loans. A major portion of U.S. resources provided through foreign economic programs in less developed countries is in the form of loans. Data on loans made under the development loan activity, under the Alliance for Progress, and under the authority of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act are shown in separate schedules. A small portion of economic program funds available for grants are loaned each year rather than granted. These loans are made for economic devel

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ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

Total number of permanent positions.
Full-time equivalent of other positions.
Average number of all employees.
Employees in permanent positions, end of year...
Employees in other positions, end of year.
Average GS grade..
Average GS salary....

Average grade, grades established by the Administrator, Agency for International Development (75 Stat. 450).

Average salary, grades established by the Administrator, Agency for International Development (75 Stat. 450)....

Average grade, grades established by the
Foreign Service Act of 1946, as amended
(22 U.S.C. 801-1158):

Foreign Service Reserve officers.
Foreign Service staff..

Average salary, grades established by the
Foreign Service Act of 1946, as amended

Personnel Summary-Continued

(22 U.S.C. 801-1158):

Foreign Service Reserve officers..

Foreign Service staff..

Average salary of ungraded positions.

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1963 actual

4.9

3.0

6.0

$15,225 $6,798 $4,292

628 4,142 145

INFORMATIONAL FOREIGN CURRENCY SCHEDULES
Foreign Currencies, Foreign Assistance
Program and Financing (in thousands of dollar equivalents)

19,582 600 5,464

30,562

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1,777

2,552

798

901

56

919

866

50

8.9

$8,787

$1,497 $1,513

-65,243-47,898

270 -286 47,898

1964 1965 estimate estimate

$13,103

1,960

9,240

12,277 364 3,280

280 2,520

21,048 14,000

-31,822

31,822 21,138

4.8

13,200 4,972 3,316

Through 1961, a portion of the mutual security dollar appropriations was used to purchase surplus agricultural commodities which were then sold to friendly countries for their currencies. Sales of these commodities are now being made through the Food for Peace program. Local currencies accruing from the sales through 1961 under the mutual security program are deposited in a special account and are used for economic and military activities in furtherance of objectives of the U.S. foreign assistance program. These activities include the local costs of projects, budget support of the less-developed countries

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Expenditures are distributed as follows:

Sec. 402, Mutual Security Act of 1954. Sec. 502, Mutual Security Act of 1954. Sec. 505 (a), Mutual Security Act of 1954.

Program by activities:

Purchase of goods or services for other countries (obligations) (object class 26) – –

Financing:

Unobligated balance brought forward.. Adjustment due to changes in exchange rates. Unobligated balance carried forward.. Unobligated balance lapsing.

Authorization to expend foreign currency receipts (permanent)

8,511

17.270

29,789

222 9

145

628

773

30,562

Analysis of Expenditures (in thousands of dollar equivalents)

3,435

112

230

1963 actual

6,539

1964 1965 estimate estimat

-805 54 8,879 346

127

2,323 73

164 5,212

10,574

15,013

18,473

798 1,777

2,575

21,048

Foreign Currency Realized Under the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act, as Amended (7 U.S.C. 1704, 104(d))

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollar equivalents)

71,177 43,490 27,038 30,275 21,048 14,000 113 -43,490 -27,038 -17,738

58,075

37,500 23,300

57,258 36,000 22,000 655 1,300 1,100 162 200 200

4,00

8,10

14,000

14,000

1,61

5

12

1964 1965 estimate estimate

3,700 2,000

-8,879 -5,179 5,179 3,179

A portion of the foreign currencies received from the sale of agricultural surplus commodities is used by the Agency for International Development to finance the purchase abroad of goods and services for other friendly countries.

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