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COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

JAMES 0. EASTLAND, Mississippi, Chairman JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, Arkansas

ROMAN L. HRUSKA, Nebraska SAM J. ERVIN, JR., North Carolina

HIRAM L. FONG, Hawaii PHILIP A. HART, Michigan

HUGH SCOTT, Pennsylvania EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts STROM THURMOND, South Carolina BIRCH BAYH, Indiana

MARLOW W. COOK, Kentucky QUENTIN N. BURDICK, North Dakota CHARLES McC. MATHIAS, JR., Maryland ROBERT C. BYRD, West Virginia

EDWARD J. GURNEY, Florida JOHN V. TUNNEY, California

SUBCOMMITTEE ON ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE

EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts, Chairman PHILIP A. HART, Michigan

STROM THURMOND, South Carolina BIRCH BAYH, Indiana

CHARLES McC. MATHIAS, JR., Maryland
QUENTIN N. BURDICK, North Dakota EDWARD J. GURNEY, Florida
JOHN V. TUNNEY, California

THOMAS M. SUSMAN, Counsel
MARK SCHNEIDER, Investigator

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1974
SENATE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICE
AND PROCEDURE OF THE SENATE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE,
JOHN F. KENNEDY FEDERAL BUILDING,

Boston, Mass. The subcommittee met at 9:30 a.m., pursuant to call, at John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, Mass., Hon. Edward M. Kennedy presiding

Present: Senator Edward M. Kennedy.

OPENING STATEMENT OF SENATOR EDWARD M. KENNEDY Senator KENNEDY. I am pleased to open this hearing of the Senate Subcommittee on Administrative Practice and Procedure of the Senate Judiciary Committee into the gasoline situation in Massachusetts. I am even more pleased that in response to our requests, in response to the questions I submitted to the FEO in relation to these hearings, and in response to the clamor of citizens and station operators across the State, we have received a 12.9 million emergency allocation for gasoline. If this is to be the response, I intend to call gasoline hearings every Saturday morning.

The Emergency Petroleum Allocation Act of 1973 states, among other requirements, that regulations implementing the law "shall provide for" “equitable distribution of . . . refined petroleum products at equitable prices among all regions and areas of the United States.

This hearing is specifically designed to help answer the question: "Is Massachusetts being treated fairly in the supply it is receiving and in the prices its citizens are having to pay for gasoline and other fuels ?"

From consumers, from our State representatives, from car owners, and from service station owners, the answer has been a strong “no." They have seen, on television, gasoline station operators from Georgia saying that they have an overabundance of gasoline. They have seen the photos of other States where there are no lines, where the supplies seem to meet the demand, regardless what percentage the Federal Office claims that its allocation system is providing.

More important, we have seen the lines in Boston, in Newton, in Springfield, and on the Cape, as I traveled around the State for 2 weeks in January. Even then, the gasoline situation was growing taut. In the past 5 weeks, since the gasoline allocation system that was designed

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