Dark Smiles: Race and Desire in George Eliot

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Ohio University Press, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 179 pages
Although George Eliot has long been described as "the novelist of the Midlands," she often brought the outer reaches of the empire home in her work. Dark Smiles: Race and Desire in George Eliot studies Eliot's problematic, career-long interest in representing racial and ethnic Otherness.

Placing Eliot's diverse and wide-ranging treatment of Otherness in its contemporary context, Alicia Carroll argues that Eliot both engages and resists traditional racial and ethnic representations of Otherness. Carroll finds that Eliot, like other women writers of her time, often appropriates narratives of Otherness to explore issues silenced in mainstream Victorian culture, particularly the problem of the desirous woman. But if Otherness in Eliot's century was usually gendered as woman and constructed as the object of white male desire, Eliot often seeks to subvert that vision. Professor Carroll demonstrates Eliot's tendency to "exoticize" images of girlhood, vocation, and maternity in order to critique and explore gendered subjectivities. Indeed, the disruptive presence of a racial or ethnic outsider often fractures Eliot's narratives of community, creating a powerful critique of home culture.

The consistent reliance of Eliot's work upon racial and ethnic Otherness as a mode of cultural critique is explored here for the first time in its entirety.

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Contents

THREE
65
Ethnicity and Sexuality
92
FIVE
107
Copyright

2 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

Alicia Carroll is an assistant professor in the English department at Auburn University. Her work on Eliot has appeared in journals such as Novel and JEGP .

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