Letters Supposed to Have Passed Between M. de St. Evremond and Mr. Waller

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Coale & Thomas, 1809 - 220 pages

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Page 13 - There needs no more be said to extol the excellence and power of his wit and pleasantness of his conversation, than that it was of magnitude enough to cover a world of very great faults ; that is, so to cover them, that they were not taken notice of to his reproach, viz.
Page 146 - While in the park I sing, the listening deer Attend my passion, and forget to fear : When to the beeches I report my flame, They bow their heads, as if they felt the same : To gods appealing, when I reach their bowersr With loud complaints they answer me in showers.
Page 11 - My lord, I am a great deal older than your grace, and have, I believe, heard more arguments for atheism than eyer your grace did ; but I have lived long enough to see there is nothing in them ; and so, I hope, your grace will.
Page 14 - ... excellence and power of his wit, and pleasantness of his conversation, than that it was of magnitude enough to cover a world of very great faults ; that is, so to cover them, that they were not taken notice of to his reproach; viz. a narrowness in his nature to...
Page 14 - ... a price ; that it had power to reconcile him to those whom he had most offended and provoked ; and continued to his age with that rare felicity, that his company was acceptable where his spirit was odious ; and he was, at least, pitied where he was most detested.
Page 152 - Sacharissa's captive fain Would untie his iron chain ; And, those scorching beams to shun, To thy gentle shadow run. If the soul had free election To dispose of her affection ; I would not thus long have borne Haughty Sacharissa's scorn : But 'tis sure some power above Which controls our wills in love...
Page 149 - Go, boy, and carve this passion on the bark " Of yonder tree, which stands the sacred mark Of noble Sidney's birth ; when such benign, Such more than mortal-making stars did shine, That there they cannot but for ever prove The monument and pledge of humble love ; His humble love whose hope shall ne'er rise higher, Than for a pardon that he dares admire.
Page 149 - Ye lofty beeches, tell this matchless dame, That if together ye fed all one flame, It could not equalise the hundredth part Of what her eyes have kindled in my heart!
Page 147 - I suffer not myself to lose The memory of what augments my woes, But with my own breath still foment the fire, Which flames as high as fancy can aspire ! This last complaint the...
Page 57 - ... to see him is in the morning, but then he walks so fast up those hills that unless you are mounted on one of my ablest hunters you will not keep pace with him! " It was not long before I obtained an audience extraordinary of this literary potentate, whom I found like Jupiter involved in clouds of his own raising. He was entrenched behind a battery of ten or twelve guns, charged with a stinking combustible called tobacco.

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