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PRINTED FOR G. WALKER, J. AKERMAN, E. EDWARDS, J. HARWOOD, W. ROBINSON

AND SONS, LIVERPOOL ; E. THOMSON, MANCHESTER ; J. NOBLE, NULL ;
J. WILSON, BERWICK; W, WHYTE AND CO. EDINBURGH ; AND R, GRIFFIN
AND CO. GDASGOW.

J. Haddon, Printer, Tabernacle Walk.

1820.//

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CONTENTS

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No.

Page.

1. Difficulty of the first address. Practice of the epic poets.

Convenience of periodical performances

1

wing and danger of looking into futurity. Writers

naturally sanguine. Their hopes liable to disappointment

3. An allegory on criticism

14 x

4. The modern form of romances preferable to the ancient. The

necessity of characters morally good

5. A meditation on the Spring

27

or Happincou not torral

33

7. Retirement natural to a great mind. Its religious use 40

& The thoughts to be brought under regulation; as they respect

the past, present, and future

46

The fondness of every man for his profession. The gradual

improvement of manufactures

53

10. Eour billets, with their answers.

Remarks on masquerades 58

11. The folly of anger. The misery of a peevish old age

66

12. The history of a young woman that came to London for a

service

73

The duty of secrecy. The invalidity of all excuses for betray-

ing secrets

81

14. The difference between an author's writings and his conver-

sation

88

15. Folly of cards. A letter from a lady that has lost her money 95

-16. The dangers and miseries of a literary eminence

103

17. The frequent contemplation of death necessary to moderate

the passions

110

18. The unhappiness of marriage caused by irregular motives of

choice

116

19. The danger of ranging from one study to another. The im-

portance of the early choice of a profession

125

20. The folly and inconvenience of affectation

· 131

21. The anxieties of literature not less than those of public sta-

tions. The inequality of author's writings

137

22. An allegory on wit and learning,

144

23. The contrariety of criticism. The vanity of objection. An

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author obliged to depend upon his own judgment 150

24. The necessity of attending to the duties of common life.

The natural character not to be forsaken

· 156

25. Rashness preferable to cowardice. Enterprize not to be re-

pressed

162

20. The mischief of extravagance, and mixiy of dependence - 168

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