Page images
PDF
EPUB

Each year, hundreds of thousands of Americans people of every age, gender, and race, and from every social, religious, and economic background—are affected by domestic violence. Domestic violence is not just a series of angry exchanges or the kind of simple quarrels that occur occasionally in almost every family. Rather, it is a grave pattern of destructive behavior and a serious crime problem that inflicts untold harm upon individuals and families and weakens the very fabric of our society. Domestic violence involves not only spouses, but also some of our Nation's most vulnerable citizens. Its victims include abused and neglected children, elderly relatives, and persons with disabilities. In every case, domestic violence leaves deep physical and emotional scars, often haunting for years the children who suffer or simply witness its terrifying effects. All too often, domestic violence results in death. Fortunately, Americans throughout both the public and private sectors are working to assist the victims of domestic violence and to stop the vicious cycle of abuse and despair. Law enforcement officials at the Federal, State, and local level, health care providers, members of private voluntary organizations, the clergy, and other concerned citizens are engaged in efforts to prevent domestic violence and to provide shelter and counseling for its victims. Many communities now have special outreach programs and residential services for affected individuals and families. This month we recognize the generosity, compassion, and hard work of all those volunteers and professionals who are working to prevent domestic violence and to help its victims. We also reaffirm our support for their vital efforts. The Congress, by House Joint Resolution 602, has designated October 1990 as "National Domestic Violence Awareness Month” and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this month. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 1990 as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. I urge all Americans to observe this month by learning more about the tragedy of domestic violence and how each of us can help bring an end to it. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentyfourth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6214 of October 24, 1990

World Population Awareness Week, 1990

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation If current projections prove accurate, the present global population of more than 5 billion will likely double by the year 2025. It may reach 14 billion by the end of the next century. In many areas of the world, particularly in less developed countries, populations are increasing without concomitant economic growth. In other, more developed nations, however, birthrates are so low that populations are not replacing themselves. The implications of both trends merit careful study and consideration-as experience has clearly shown us, there is a significant relationship between demographic change, economic development, the use of resources, and environmental management. The United States has long recognized that population growth, in and of itself, is a neutral phenomenon. As we noted during the 1984 International Conference on Population, because human beings are producers as well as consumers, population growth may be an asset or a liability depending on such factors as government economic policies, agricultural practices, and a nation's ability to put men and women to work. Demographic change can become problematic when a nation fails to anticipate or to accommodate growth. Increases in population can pose difficulties when the creation of housing and health facilities does not keep pace or when valuable resources such as arable land, forests, and water are used without regard to future needs. Population growth may also be viewed as a threat in countries where centralized economic planning and government price controls eliminate incentives for farmers and other workers to produce. Many governments, private organizations, and concerned individuals around the world have been studying population trends and working to meet the challenges and opportunities those trends create. Over the years, the United States has been a leader in efforts to focus attention on population issues; to promote international cooperation; and to develop and implement population programs that are consistent with individual dignity and human rights. For example, in addition to supporting voluntary family planning activities, we have strived to promote environmental conservation and sustainable economic development in poor countries. We have also steadfastly advocated the political and economic freedom that is vital to the advancement of individuals and nations. The United States believes that population programs must be truly voluntary, that they must not only recognize the rights and responsibilities of individuals and families but also respect their religious and cultural values. When population programs are conducted in accordance with this view, when they affirm and enhance the dignity and potential of the individual, they can and do promote the health of mothers and children, the stability of families, and, subsequently, the strength and wellbeing of entire nations. The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 158, has designated the week of October 21 through October 27, 1990, as "World Population Awareness Week" and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of October 21 through October 27, 1990, as World Population Awareness Week. I invite all Americans to observe this week with appropriate programs and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentyfourth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6215 of October 24, 1990

Eating Disorders Awareness Week, 1990

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Anorexia nervosa and bulimia, collectively known as eating disorders, are emotional disorders that can lead to serious physical illness and even death. Anorexia nervosa is expressed in deliberate self-starvation, which is manifested in an extreme aversion to food. It is closely related to, and often accompanied by, bulimia, which is marked by binge eating and purging. Experts who have studied eating disorders estimate that one out of every 100 women between the ages of 12 and 25 suffers from anorexia nervosa, and that one of every seven women in the same age group develops bulimia. However, they also note that nearly 10 percent of all patients referred to eating disorder clinics are men. Although the causes of anorexia nervosa and bulimia are still unknown, researchers believe that a combination of psychological, environmental, and physiological factors contribute to the development of one or both of these disorders. Treatment for anorexia and bulimia entails a combination of medical care and psychotherapy for the patient, as well as counseling for parents, spouses, and siblings. The patient's participation in a self-help group is an adjunct to medical and psychiatric care. Advances in our understanding of anorexia nervosa and bulimia have been made possible through the concerted efforts of scientists, physicians, and counselors, as well as victims and their families. Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institutes of Health are working to discover the causes of these disorders and are using a multidisciplinary approach to diagnose and treat them. Private voluntary organizations such as the American Anorexia/Bulimia Association, the National Anorexic Aid Society, and the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders offer information regarding treatment centers, hospitals, clinics, and doctors specializing in eating disorders.

To recognize the importance of such efforts and to enhance public awareness of the dangers of eating disorders, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 214, has designated the week beginning October 22, 1990, as "Eating Disorders Awareness Week” and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of October 22, 1990, as Eating Disorders Awareness Week. I invite all Americans to join with concerned health care professionals and government officials in observing this week through appropriate programs and activities directed toward the prevention and cure of anorexia nervosa and bulimia. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentyfourth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6216 of October 25, 1990

Yosemite National Park Centennial Year, 1990–1991

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation One hundred years ago, on October 1, 1890, President Benjamin Harrison signed into law an act establishing Yosemite National Park. Located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, Yosemite is the Nation's third oldest national park and one of its greatest natural treasures. During this centennial year all Americans can be grateful for the vision and foresight of those who advocated the preservation of this magnificent portion of our country. They not only saved a priceless legacy for succeeding generations, but also provided an enduring model of environmental stewardship for all Americans to emulate. Almost 3 decades before the legislation signed by President Harrison established Yosemite as the Nation's third national park, the beautiful and majestic lands it now encompasses helped to animate the environmental conservation movement. On June 30, 1864, President Lincoln signed into law an act granting Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias to the State of California, to "... be held for public use, resort, and recreation ... inalienable for all time." Known as the Yosemite Grant, this act was the first law to set aside lands for the preservation of their unique characteristics and extraordinary scenic value. In fact, the historic Yosemite Grant laid the foundation for the development of national parks, the first of which became a reality in 1872 with the establishment of Yellowstone. Uniquely American, the concept of national parks—and the preservation ethic they affirm and inspire-has spread worldwide. Today, spanning more than 750,000 acres or approximately 1,190 square miles, Yosemite National Park is acclaimed for its spectacular scenery, exotic plants, and wide array of wildlife. The glacially carved Yosemite Valley contains two of the world's highest waterfalls. El Capitan is one of the largest exposed monoliths of granite in the world, and it is one of the many magnificent granite formations in the park. Half Dome itself is a geographic feature recognized around the world. The three groves of giant sequoias found in the park astound visitors with their breathtaking beauty and sheer size—the Grizzly Giant is the fifth largest tree in the world. Yosemite also contains more than 1,300 species of flowering plants, many of them rare. The wildlife inhabiting the park includes several rare and/or endangered species, among them the bald eagle and the peregrine falcon. Yosemite's unparalleled beauty, abundant wildlife, and other natural resources enrich us in many ways. Each year thousands of people from around the Nation and the world visit the park for recreation and renewal. Families on leisurely visits explore Yosemite as eagerly as students and professionals, all of them embarked, to one degree or another, on great adventures in learning. Indeed, Yosemite is a wonderful place to study not only the earth's development and fragile ecosystems but also the history of the peoples who have inhabited this great land through the ages. Native peoples occupied the region that is now Yosemite as many as 4,000 or more years ago, and the known prehistoric trade routes through the region are among the most important in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The park also contains a wealth of artifacts and historic sites that tell the story of more recent inhabitants, such as the explorers and traders who flocked to the region during the California gold rush era. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984 by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Yosemite is one of the most beautiful and fascinating places on the North American continent and, indeed, the entire planet. This year we proudly celebrate its centennial and express our appreciation for all those who have maintained the park during the past 100 years. By House Joint Resolution 398, the Congress has recognized and commemorated the 100th anniversary of Yosemite National Park and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this occasion. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the year beginning October 1, 1990, as Yosemite National Park Centennial Year. I encourage the people of the United States and their elected representatives at the Federal, State, and local level to observe this year with appropriate programs and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fifth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

« PreviousContinue »