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of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6145 of June 14, 1990

Flag Day and National Flag Week, 1990

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Of all the images and symbols that have come to represent the United States, from the towering figure of Uncle Sam to the beautiful yet fearsome bald eagle, the flag occupies a unique place in our hearts and in our history. It is our Nation's greatest emblem, the standard carried into battle by generations of brave and selfless Americans. As a tangible reminder of their great sacrifices, and as a symbol of the freedom with which we have been blessed, it is a banner we raise with a duly profound sense of pride and reverence. The flag officially took shape on June 14, 1777, when the delegates to the Continental Congress resolved “that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the Union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.” However, the Stars and Stripes had acquired meaning months earlier, when our Founding Fathers boldly affirmed the rights of individuals and declared America's independence from Great Britain. The "new constellation” of which the Continental Congress spoke was our young Nation, a nation where "freedom's holy light” would gleam forth, giving hope to all those living in the darkness of tyranny and serving as a guide to all those charting their own course toward liberty and selfgovernment. Today, in quiet glory, the Stars and Stripes continue to proclaim the shining promise of America. For millions of people around the world, the flag has bid welcome, marking a place of refuge from religious and political persecution. For millions of others, it has represented the liberty to which all men are heirs. When we look to the Red, White, and Blue, we cannot fail to take pride in the respect accorded to our flag around the world. Our Nation's flag emerged from the triumphant struggle to represent the idea “that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." One individual who recognized the importance of that struggle to all mankind was the Marquis de Lafayette. This courageous Frenchman understood that, because liberty is the God-given right of all men, the cause of freedom is universal. He eagerly joined in the American Revolution and, on July 31, 1777, was appointed a Major General by the Continental Congress. Time and again throughout the Revolutionary War, Lafayette proved his bravery and his love of freedom. Shortly after the war's conclusion, he decribed its significance with these joyous words: "America assured her independence; mankind's cause is won, and liberty is no longer homeless on earth.” Following his death in 1834, Lafayette was buried in the Picpus Cemetery in Paris, beneath American soil, as he had requested. On the Fourth of July just 6 weeks after his death, an American flag was raised above his grave. It is reported to have flown there continuously ever since, even during the German occupation of France during World War II. Today the flag that flies over the grave of our dear friend, Lafayette, continues to serve as a reminder that the cause of liberty and democratic government is universal. Indeed, as Lafayette knew so well, "freedom's holy light” can never be extinguished because God has given it a home in every human heart. Wherever we look to Old Glory today—whether in our schools, in our courts of law, or at isolated military installations thousands of miles from these shores—may all of us be united in our love for this great land of ours. On this joyous occasion, may we also renew our determination to uphold the ideals enshrined in our Constitution and Declaration of Independence, so that the flag might always be the symbol of a nation that is both great and good. To commemorate the adoption of our flag, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved August 3, 1949 (63 Stat. 492), designated June 14 of each year as Flag Day and requested the President to issue an annual proclamation calling for its observance and for the display of the flag of the United States on all government buildings. The Congress also requested the President, by joint resolution approved June 9, 1966 (80 Stat. 194), to issue annually a proclamation designating the week in which June 14 occurs as National Flag Week and calling upon all citizens of the United States to display the flag during that week. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim June 14, 1990, as Flag Day, and the week beginning June 10, 1990, as National Flag Week. I direct the appropriate officials of the government to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings during that week. I urge all Americans to observe Flag Day, June 14, and Flag Week, by flying the Stars and Stripes from their homes and other suitable places. I also urge the American people to celebrate those days from Flag Day through Independence Day, also set aside by the Congress (89 Stat. 211), as a time to honor America by having public gatherings and activities at which they can honor their country in an appropriate manner, including publicly reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

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GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6146 of June 14, 1990

Baltic Freedom Day, 1990

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The struggle for Baltic freedom has entered a new era of great promise and hope. The 50-year-long effort by the peoples of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia to regain freedom and democracy has begun to bear fruit. The international community has long decried the dark summer of 1940 when, as a result of a self-serving agreement made earlier by Hitler and Stalin in the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, the Baltic States were denied their independent status. During that fateful summer, Soviet troops invaded and occupied the Baltic States. The rigged elections that followed put an end to Baltic self-determination. These events, however, did not end the desire of the Baltic peoples for freedom and independence. During the past year, they have taken major steps toward achieving self-determination. Generally free and fair elections based on a vigorous multiparty political system produced popular legislatures. In decisions reflecting the will of the Baltic peoples, Lithuania, Estonia, and Latvia have asserted their intention to restore their independence. The representatives of the Baltic peoples have taken a nonviolent path and have consistently appealed for dialogue and negotiations with Moscow. For 50 years the United States has refused to recognize the forced incorporation of the Baltic States into the Soviet Union. As I assured the Prime Minister of Lithuania during her recent visit, the United States will remain faithful to this policy. We support self-determination for the Baltic peoples, and we call upon the Soviet Union to enter a good-faith dialogue with representatives of the Baltic governments who received popular mandates in free and fair elections. We are encouraged by recent steps in that direction and hope that a full and productive dialogue will materialize. The right to liberty and self-determination; free and fair elections; a better life for themselves and for their children—these are the just aspirations of the people of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. On this Baltic Freedom Day, we reaffirm our support for them. The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 251, has designated June 14, 1990, as "Baltic Freedom Day" and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim June 14, 1990, as Baltic Freedom Day. I call upon the people of the United States of America to observe this day with appropriate remembrances and ceremonies to reaffirm their commitment to principles of freedom and liberty for all oppressed people. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6147 of June 14, 1990

Father's Day, 1990

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Each year, on the third Sunday in June, we pause to honor our fathers and to express our gratitude for their generosity and devotion. Father's Day is more than a day rich in family love and tradition—it is also a day when we are deeply mindful of the many ways fathers strengthen our communities and Nation. As children, we cannot fully fathom the depth of our father's love for us. Neither can we fully realize the weight of his responsibilities. Children cherish their father's affection and attention, as well as the time they spend together—be it playing a favorite game, assembling a kite or train set, or discovering the wonders of books, history, and nature. Rarely do they perceive in their father's tender gaze the worries, frustrations, and concerns that have ever been a part of parenting. When a child is hurt or sick, he knows only that there is comfort and reassurance in his father's warm embrace. He cannot know the quiet heartache of the man who would, if it were somehow possible, gladly suffer in his stead. When a child says goodbye on his first day of school, or learns how to ride a bike for the first time, he hears only the encouragement and pride in his father's voice. He cannot hear his father's unspoken prayers for his safety and well-being on the many journeys that lie ahead. Eager to protect, nurture, and provide for his children, a father constantly gives of himself, always striving to do his best and always hoping that his best will be enough. As we grow older, we cannot fail to recognize this love and selflessness as the essence of fatherhood. With each passing year, and especially as we have children of our own, we become ever more grateful for our father's love and discipline, and for the many sacrifices he has made for our sake. We begin to see clearly how being a father requires faith and fortitude, and we begin to understand the enormous responsibility shouldered by one of our dearest friends and teachers. Through their dad, young people learn important lessons about love and commitment, duty and fidelity, and respect and concern for others. The importance of his example cannot be overstated, because the man who is faithful, giving, and forgiving also teaches his children powerful lessons about the One who is the just and loving Father of us all. Because children remember these lessons for a lifetime, and because these lessons influence their behavior as members of a larger community, fathers play a very important role in shaping the character of our Nation. Today we thank dads everywhere for all they do, throughout the year, for our families and country. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, in accordance with a joint resolution of the Congress approved April 24, 1972 (36 U.S.C. 142a), do hereby proclaim Sunday, June 17, 1990, as Father's Day. I invite the States and communities and people of the United States to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies as a mark of appreciation and abiding affection for their fathers. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal Government buildings, and I urge all Americans to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6148 of June 15, 1990

National Scleroderma Awareness Week, 1990

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Scleroderma is a painful and often progressive connective tissue disease that can result in serious debilitation and even death. This disease, whose name literally means "hard skin," is marked by the excess production of collagen, the main fibrous component of connective tissue. This overproduction of collagen causes the skin to harden and thicken and may adversely affect internal organs such as the heart, lungs, and kidneys as well. Victims who suffer from thickening of the esophagus may have difficulty swallowing solid food. The course of the disease varies among individuals, and it may strike at any age. However, scleroderma usually affects people during their working years. Today thousands of Americans, most of them women, have scleroderma. Its impact in terms of physical and emotional suffering and financial loss is enormous. Although the cause of scleroderma has not been identified, physicians and scientists have gained a greater understanding of the disease. Today there is reason to hope that improved methods of diagnosis and treatment will one day eliminate scleroderma as a cause of distress among individuals and their families. Determined to advance the fight against scleroderma, many governmental, scientific, and voluntary health organizations are working together to promote education and research in this field.

To increase public awareness of scleroderma and to recognize the importance of ongoing research into this disease, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 516, has designated the week beginning June 10, 1990, as “National Scleroderma Awareness Week” and has authorized and

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