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General Assembly provided a resounding affirmation of the ideals enshrined in our Bill of Rights. This Declaration established a common standard of conduct for all peoples and all governments. Its signatories agreed to respect freedom of thought, freedom of conscience, as well as freedom of religion and belief. They also recognized an individual's right to freedom of movement and assembly, as well as his right to participate in the government of his country and to own property, either alone or in association with others. Noting that respect for the "inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice, and peace in the world,” the Declaration reaffirmed our conviction that human rights violations are the concern of all mankind, and not simply the internal affair of any given nation. In some areas of the world, we are witnessing historic change and significant improvements in human rights. We applaud the changes and at the same time will remain vigilant to help ensure that progress continues. We will continue to encourage institutionalization of reforms already introduced. Tragically, however, in contempt for the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and for fundamental standards of morality, the rights of individuals are still being denied in many countries around the world. We will continue to condemn such human rights violations and to call upon the leaders of all countries to honor both the letter and spirit of international human rights agreements. Safeguarding individual liberty and fundamental human rights is not only the duty of any legitimate government, but also the key to economic prosperity and lasting peace among nations. The United States thus has both a moral obligation and a proper interest in defending human rights and denouncing abuses of them wherever and whenever they occur. Our commitment to this obligation is unflagging. So, this week, as we give thanks for the freedom we enjoy as Americans, let us also renew our determination to value and protect the rights of others. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim December 10, 1989, as Human Rights Day and December 15, 1989, as Bill of Rights Day, and I call upon all Americans to observe the week beginning December 10, 1989, as Human Rights Week. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of December, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6083 of December 11, 1989

National Drunk and Drugged Driving Awareness Week, 1989

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation As we prepare to celebrate the holidays and rejoice in the promise of the new year, it is fitting that we pause to remember the perils of drinking and driving. Each year, traffic accidents caused by drunk and drugged driving claim the lives of thousands of Americans. Many others are seriously injured as a result of such incidents. This week, we renew our commitment, as individuals and as a Nation, to keeping our roads and highways safe—not only during the holiday season, but throughout the year. In past years, programs and activities held in observance of National Drunk and Drugged Driving Awareness Week have proven to be effective in enhancing public awareness of the dangers of driving while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. These programs and activities have been organized by concerned citizens and business leaders, as well as by public officials at all levels of government. Through candlelight vigils, safety campaigns, and voluntary efforts to provide rides from holiday parties, private citizens and business owners have helped focus greater attention on the problem of drunk and drugged driving. Governors, mayors, and other local officials have not only issued proclamations in observance of this week, but have also appointed special task forces to address the issue. The introduction of new drunk driving legislation in various States and the implementation of innovative law enforcement and detection programs have helped improve the safety of roads and highways across the country. These successful voluntary efforts and coordinated governmental activities demonstrate how each and every American can join in the fight against drunk and drugged driving. Tragically, however, while we have made considerable progress in our efforts to reduce alcohol- and drug-impaired driving, approximately half of all fatal motor vehicle collisions continue to be alcohol-related. Some 80 percent of these accidents involve a legally intoxicated driver or pedestrian. These statistics mean that, during 1988, alcohol played a role in more than 23,000 traffic deaths. The toll in terms of personal suffering and loss can never be measured. The observance of National Drunk and Drugged Driving Awareness Week reminds us of how much more we have to do in order to eliminate this senseless carnage of our Nation's roads and highways. Each of us must recognize the grave dangers posed by drinking and driving, and we must refuse to tolerate it. We must also recognize that drugsincluding prescribed medications and those purchased over-thecounter-can seriously impair one's judgment and driving ability, whether taken alone or in combination with alcohol. This week provides an opportunity for all Americans to become involved in the campaign against drunk and drugged driving. We can do so by supporting the work of local law enforcement officials and by demonstrating a sense of personal responsibility ourselves. We can en

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courage friends and neighbors who consume alcohol to do so in moder-
ation; and when a friend or neighbor drinks, we can refuse to let him
or her drive. We can also wear a safety belt whenever we are behind
the wheel, and we can insist that passengers do the same.
In order to encourage more citizens to become involved in efforts to
improve the safety of our Nation's roads and highways, the Congress,
by House Joint Resolution 429, has designated the week of December
10 through December 16, 1989, as "National Drunk and Drugged Driving
Awareness Week” and has authorized and requested the President to
issue a proclamation in observance of this week.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States
of America, do hereby proclaim the week of December 10 through De-
cember 16, 1989, as National Drunk and Drugged Driving Awareness
Week. I ask each American to help improve the safety of our highways
by refusing to tolerate drunk and drugged driving. I also call upon the
Governors of the several States, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Is-
lands, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and American Samoa, the chief offi-
cials of local governments, and the people of the United States to ob-
serve this week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh
day of December, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-
nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two
hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Editorial note: For the President's remarks of Dec. 11, 1989, on signing Proclamation 6083, see the Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents (vol. 25, p. 1928).

Proclamation 6084 of December 14, 1989

Wright Brothers Day, 1989

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation
Less than a century ago, Orville and Wilbur Wright ushered in the age
of modern aviation with the first sustained, manned flight in a me-
chanically propelled aircraft. Although their flight lasted only 12 sec-
onds and spanned only 120 feet over the windy beach at Kitty Hawk,
North Carolina, it began an exciting process of design, trial, and dis-
covery that continues to this day.
Today, as we recall the historic events of that cold, windy December
afternoon in 1903, we also celebrate the tremendous progress in avia-
tion that has been made during the past 86 years. Advances in air
transportation have linked nations and continents, bringing the peoples
of the world ever closer together. Man has journeyed into space, and
American astronauts have walked on the moon. Now we are shaping
further plans for manned space flight beyond Earth's orbit and into the
solar system.

By the end of this year, Americans will have used commercial aircraft more than 475 million times to travel around the country and around the world. Only 86 years after the Wright brothers took to the skies with their bold yet tentative flight, we are able to travel millions of miles with confidence and ease. On Wright Brothers Day, we salute all the courageous pioneers who, with vision and determination, have made these great advances possible. In so doing, they have not only helped make American aviation a model for the world but also led the way to the exploration of our universe. The Congress, by a joint resolution approved December 17, 1963 (77 Stat. 402; 36 U.S.C. 169), has designated the 17th day of December of each year as "Wright Brothers Day” and requested the President to issue annually a proclamation inviting the people of the United States to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies and activities. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim December 17, 1989, as Wright Brothers Day. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of December, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eightynine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6085 of January 3, 1990

Earth Day, 1990

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The world's natural resources sustain not only the economic and social development of nations, but the entire spectrum of life on Earth. In our natural surroundings, we find breathtaking beauty and order—reflections of the magnificent designs of our Creator. Environmental problems, on the other hand, reveal the tragic consequences of our failure to cherish and protect these wonderful gifts. Twenty years ago, on January 1, 1970, then-President Nixon signed the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 into law. This legislation signalled our Nation's growing concern about the state of the environment and set forth important Federal policy goals. Today, another decade is unfolding before us—the third since America's strengthened commitment to protecting our natural resources. As we enter the 1990s, it is fitting that we pause once again to assess the state of our environment. Tremendous progress has been made during the past 20 years in addressing environmental problems, yet great challenges remain. Many scientists are concerned that a buildup of certain gases in the atmosphere may cause significant climate changes with serious, widespread consequences, and there is growing evidence that the stratospheric ozone layer is gradually being depleted. Problems such as acid rain, deforestation, ocean pollution, and the improper disposal of toxic wastes also pose threats to the health of our planet. That is why, as we welcome the promise of a new decade, we must strengthen and renew our commitment to environmental protection. While some of the challenges before us have changed, our responsibilities are the same today as those recognized 20 years ago. As a nation, we must acknowledge that our environment and economy are interdependent. We must also go beyond the traditional regulatory role of government and continue to seek solutions that embrace all sectors of society in preventing pollution and ecological damage before they occur. The first Earth Day helped increase dramatically public awareness of ecological issues. Across the country, millions of people rallied to express their concerns about pollution and to learn how they could help clean up and protect the environment. Thanks to the educational programs and volunteer programs established since then, many Americans now are more faithful stewards of our precious natural resources. Today the United States is a leader in environmental protection. We have made important progress toward improving air quality through enforcement of the Clean Air Act, the phasing out of leaded gasoline, and more stringent fuel efficiency standards for automobiles. We have expanded our parks, wildlife refuges, and wilderness areas. We have made major advances in protecting our lakes, rivers, and streams; and we have begun to clean up once-neglected toxic waste sites. The United States has also been a leader in the worldwide effort to study and address global climate change. Through our participation in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, we are working to promote environmental safeguards not only at home but also abroad. Today we vow to press on with this vital work. On the day he signed the National Environmental Policy Act, President Nixon said the 1970s “must be the years when America pays its debt to the past by reclaiming the purity of its air, its waters, and our living environment." Today I say the 1990s must be the years when we not only pay our debt to the past, but also fulfill our obligation to protect this earthly home for generations yet unborn. To heighten public awareness of the need for active participation in the protection of the environment and to promote the formation of an international alliance that responds to global environmental concerns, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 159, has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this day. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, April 22, 1990, as Earth Day. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities designed to promote greater understanding of ecological issues. I also ask the American people to rededicate themselves—in their practices as consumers and citizens—to protecting the environment. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this third day of January, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety, and of

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