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Proclamation 6078 of November 27, 1989

National Alzheimer's Disease Month, 1989 and 1990

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation At medical facilities and research institutions across the country, dedicated scientists are piecing together the puzzle of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is a living nightmare for the millions of older Americans who suffer from it. The disease robs its victims of their memory and judgment, their health, their independence, and, eventually, their lives. Research has taught us many things about Alzheimer's disease that we did not know just one decade ago. More physicians now recognize the illness, and they know how to treat some of the problems it causes. Unfortunately, however, physicians and scientists do not yet know how to cure the disease or stop it from progressing. We do know that continued research is vital. At the forefront of scientific research on Alzheimer's disease is the Federal Government's National Institute on Aging. The National Institute on Aging, along with other government agencies and private voluntary organizations such as the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association, is working to advance our knowledge about this tragic disease. Scientific research has yielded a number of promising leads, and it holds the ultimate hope for the victims of Alzheimer's disease and their families. Nevertheless, until a cure is found, there is much that can be done to improve care and alleviate the emotional stress this disease imposes on families. The knowledge that has been acquired about effective treatment programs and care strategies needs to be shared with both professional and family caregivers. Continued efforts must be made to coordinate the many local, State, and Federal programs involving Alzheimer's disease and to get needed information into the hands of health and social service professionals who serve Alzheimer patients and their families. Only through a concerted effort can we ensure that the victims of this disease receive the highest quality care. To enhance public awareness of Alzheimer's disease, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 16, has designated the months of November 1989 and 1990 as "National Alzheimer's Disease Month” and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of these months. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the months of November 1989 and 1990 as National Alzheimer's Disease Month and call upon the people of the United States to observe these months with appropriate ceremonies and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-seventh day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6079 of November 27, 1989

National Home Care Week, 1989 and 1990

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Throughout the United States, dedicated professionals and volunteers working in more than 12,000 home health care agencies are bringing needed medical services to millions of ill and disabled Americans. This week, as we recognize these hardworking men and women for their efforts, we also acknowledge the important role that home care plays in our Nation's health care system. When appropriate, home care is more than an effective and economical alternative to institutionalization. For the patient, it can bring the added comfort and reassurance of a warm, familiar environment. Home care not only emphasizes the dignity and independence of the patient, but also alleviates the suffering caused by separation from loved ones. In the home, a patient is able to obtain treatment while enjoying the love and support of his or her family. Working in concert with government agencies and concerned organizations, home health care providers give millions of ill and disabled Americans a welcome alternative to hospitalization and other institutionalized forms of care. During National Home Care Week, we recognize the benefits of this important partnership. To increase public awareness and support for our Nation's home health care service providers, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 184, has designated the weeks beginning November 26, 1989, and November 25, 1990, as "National Home Care Week” and has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for appropriate observances of these weeks. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim November 26 through December 2, 1989, and November 25 through December 1, 1990, as National Home Care Week. I urge all concerned government officials, health care and social service providers, private voluntary organizations, insurance companies, and the American public to observe these weeks with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-seventh day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6080 of December 5, 1989

National American Indian Heritage Week, 1989

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation During our recent celebration of Thanksgiving, our Nation paused to reflect upon the peace and prosperity with which we have been blessed by our Creator. In so doing, we carried on a tradition observed by the pilgrims at Plymouth Colony when they gathered to give thanks for an abundant harvest following a cold and bitter winter. The settlers at Plymouth Colony were able to reap that harvest largely because of the help they received from neighboring Indians. Today, as we observe American Indian Heritage Week, we recall the many contributions Native Americans have made over the years to the development of this

great land.

On numerous occasions, American Indians helped the early settlers gain a firm footing in the New World, showing them how to farm the strange new soil or acting as guides through uncharted territory. Indeed, throughout our Nation's history, we have learned much from Native Americans. Our cultural heritage has been enriched immeasurably by the many different customs and traditions practiced by American Indians and Native Alaskans. Each tribe has shared with us wonderful portions of its unique history and character. Native Americans have also served this country with distinction, sharing the wealth of their knowledge and talents. They have been courageous members of the Armed Forces, and they have participated in public service at every level—including the Office of Vice President. While national policies regarding Indian affairs have been uncertain and often inequitable in the past, tribal elected governments and the United States have now established a unique and special governmentto-government relationship, which was strengthened and renewed during the last 2 decades. Today we look forward to greater economic independence and self-sufficiency for Native Americans, and we reaffirm our support for increased Indian control over tribal government affairs. The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 218, has designated the week beginning December 3, 1989, and ending December 9, 1989, as “National American Indian Heritage Week” and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning December 3, 1989, and ending December 9, 1989, as National American Indian Heritage Week, and I ask all Americans to observe this week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of December, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6081 of December 5, 1989

National Cities Fight Back Against Drugs Week, 1989

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The frightening consequences of drug trafficking and illicit drug use can be witnessed in communities throughout the United States—in troubled schools, in neighborhoods scarred by violence, and in overburdened hospitals, social service programs, and law enforcement agencies. All of us pay the tremendous economic costs of the drug problem, but it exacts a far greater toll in the number of lives lost and families destroyed. Those costs can never be reclaimed. While no part of our Nation has been able to avoid the devastating effects of the traffic and use of illegal drugs, America's cities—large and small_bear the brunt of this plague. In far too many of our Nation's cities, it is unsafe to walk the streets in certain areas; families take shelter behind bolted doors and drawn shades; and hospital staffs struggle to save the lives of infants born addicted to drugs. Fortunately, however, this terrible problem is not going unchallenged. In every area of the country, cities are fighting back. Today, concerned residents of our Nation's cities are working together to regain control of their streets, their parks, their schools, and their lives. In the finest tradition of democratic government and voluntary association, individual citizens are standing shoulder to shoulder with local authorities as they confront the merchants of death who deal drugs. They are marching in the streets, asserting their right to live without fear in secure homes and neighborhoods, and they are voting for leaders who will be tough on crime. They are also remaining vigilant against suspicious activity in their communities while encouraging young people to resist the temptation to try drugs. These determined men and women are behaving as responsible citizens in a free and just society by working closely with their local representatives and law enforcement agencies. Ultimately, it is the actions of concerned Americans that will win the war on drugs. The American people will prevail in this fight because the small percentage of persons who currently buy and sell drugs must one day recognize and accept the morally just stance of the vast majority who do not. This week, we salute those Americans in cities all across our Nation who are serving as full partners in this all-important campaign. They are helping to build a better future for our Nation—a future that is drug-free. The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 205, has designated the week of December 3 through December 9, 1989, as "National Cities Fight Back Against Drugs Week” and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of December 3 through December 9, 1989, as National Cities Fight Back Against Drugs Week. I invite the Governors of the several States, the chief officials of local governments, and the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of December, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6082 of December 10, 1989

Human Rights Day, Bill of Rights Day, and Human Rights Week, 1989

By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” With these words, our Nation's Founding Fathers declared America's independence from Great Britain more than 200 years ago. In so doing, they asserted the principles that form the fundamental moral vision of the United States. That vision—which recognizes protection of the God-given rights of individuals as the only legitimate end of just government-has inspired the United State's efforts to promote and defend the cause of freedom around the world. We Americans are firmly committed to the advancement of freedom and human rights because we also recognize the inherent relationship between respect for the worth and dignity of each person and the attainment of genuine peace and security. In 1789, our Nation's Founding Fathers enumerated the rights of individuals in the first ten amendments proposed to our Constitution, known as the Bill of Rights. James Madison once noted that the idea of a Bill of Rights was valuable because "political truths declared in that solemn manner acquire by degrees the character of fundamental maxims of free government.” Two hundred years later, the principles enshrined in our Bill of Rights have proved to be not only guiding tenets of American government, but also a model for the world. The Bill of Rights guarantees freedom of speech and of the press, as well as freedom of religion and association; it ensures that no person shall be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law; and it prohibits unreasonable search and seizure of a person's home, papers, or possessions. The Bill of Rights also guarantees anyone accused of a crime the right to a jury trial and defense counsel; the right to be informed of the charges against him; and protection against cruel or unusual punishment. Two hundred years after the Bill of Rights was proposed to the States by the Congress, we can behold the remarkable influence and prescience of our Nation's Founding Fathers. In the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted on December 10, 1948, the United Nations

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