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d. Strengthening Armed Vessel of Foreign Nation

Title 18, United States Code. 1 * * * 8 961. Strengthening armed vessel of foreign nation

Whoever, within the United States, increases or augments the force of any ship of war, cruiser, or other armed vessel which, at the time of her arrival within the United States, was a ship of war, or cruiser, or armed vessel, in the service of any foreign prince or state, or of any colony, district, or people, or belonging to the subjects or citizens of any such prince or state, colony, district, or people, the same being at war with any foreign prince or state, or of any colony, district, or people, with whom the United States is at peace, by adding to the number of the guns of such vessel, or by changing those on board of her for guns of a larger caliber, or by adding thereto any equipment solely applicable to war, shall be fined not more than $1,000 or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.

1 Sec. 961 was enacted as part of Public Law 80-772 (62 Stat. 745).

7. National Security Council Partial text of Public Law 80-253 (S. 758), 61 Stat. 495, approved July 26, 1947; a

amended by Public Law 81-216, 63 Stat. 578, approved August 10, 1949; Public Law 82-165, 65 Stat. 373, approved October 10, 1951; Public Law 99-433, (HR 3622), 100 Stat. 992, approved October 1, 1986; and by Public Law 100-690 (H.R

5210), 102 Stat. 4181 at 4182, approved November 18, 1988 AN ACT To promote the national security by providing for a Secretary of Defense

for a National Military Establishment; for a Department of the Army, a Department of the Navy, and a Department of the Air Force; and for the coordination of the activities of the National Military Establishment with other departments and agencies of the Government concerned with the national security.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That:

SHORT TITLE

That this Act may be cited as the "National Security Act of 1947.

TITLE I-COORDINATION FOR NATIONAL SECURITY

NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL

Sec. 101.1 (a) ESTABLISHMENT; PRESIDING OFFICER; FUNCTIONS; COMPOSITION

There is established a council to be known as the National Security Council (hereinafter in this section referred to as the "Council").

The President of the United States shall preside over meetings of the Council: Provided, That in his absence he may designate a member of the Council to preside in his place.

The function of the Council shall be to advise the President with respect to the integration of domestic, foreign, and military policies relating to the national security so as to enable the military services and the other departments and agencies of the Government to cooperate more effectively in matters involving the national security. The Council shall be composed of,

(1) the President;
(2) the Vice-President; 2
(3) the Secretary of State;
(4) the Secretary of Defense;
(5) the Director for Mutual Security; 3

1 50 U.S.C. 402.

2 The Vice President was made a member of the Council by the National Security Act Amendments of 1949 (Public Law 81-216; 63 Stat. 578).

3 The Director for Mutual Security was made a member under the Mutual Security Act of 1951 (Public Law 82-165; 65 Stat. 373). The Chairman of the National Security Resources Board

Continued

(6) the Chairman of the National Security Resources Board; 3 and

(7) the Secretaries and Under Secretaries of other executive departments and of the military departments, the Chairman of the Munitions Board and the Chairman of the Research and Development Board,5 when appointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to serve at his

pleasure.
(b) ADDITIONAL FUNCTIONS.

In addition to performing such other functions as the President may direct, for the purpose of more effectively coordinating the policies and functions of the departments and agencies of the Government relating to the national security, it shall, subject to the direction of the President, be the duty of the Council

(1) to assess and appraise the objectives, commitments, and 1

risks of the United States in relation to our actual and potential military power, in the interest of national security, for the purpose of making recommendations to the President in connection therewith; and

(2) to consider policies on matters of common interest to the departments and agencies of the Government concerned with the national security, and to make recommendations to the

President in connection therewith. (c) EXECUTIVE SECRETARY; APPOINTMENT AND COMPENSATION: STAFF EMPLOYEES

The Council shall have a staff to be headed by a civilian executive secretary who shall be appointed by the President. The executive secretary, subject to the direction of the Council, is authorized, subject to the civil-service laws and Chapter 51 and subchapter III

of chapter 53 of Title 5, to appoint and fix the compensation of 1. such personnel as may be necessary to perform such duties as may

be prescribed by the Council in connection with the performance of its functions.

(d) RECOMMENDATIONS AND REPORTS

The Council shall, from time to time, make such recommendations, and such other reports to the President as it deems appropriate or as the President may require.

(e) 6 The Chairman (or in his absence the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff may, in his role as principal military adviser to the National Security Council and subject to the direction of the President, attend and participate in meetings of the National Security Council.

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was a member under the original Act. Both positions and their function with respect to being a member of the National Security Council were abolished in 1953.

* The Secretaries of the Army, Navy and Air Force were members under the 1947 Act. Their memberships were abolished by the National Security Act Amendments of 1949 (Public Law 81216; 63 Stat. 578).

5 The Munitions Board and the Research and Development Board, together with their respective offices of the Chairman, were abolished by sec. 2 of Reorganization Plan No. 6 of 1953 (5 U.S.C. App; 67 Stat. 638). All functions of each board were transferred to the Secretary of Defense.

6 Subsec. (e) was added by sec. 203 of the DOD Reorganization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-433; 100 Stat. 1011).

(f)? The Director of National Drug Control Policy may, in his role as principal adviser to the National Security Council on national drug control policy, and subject to the direction of the President, attend and participate in meetings of the National Security Council.

ANNUAL NATIONAL SECURITY STRATEGY REPORT Sec. 104.8 (a)(1) The President shall transmit to Congress each year a comprehensive report on the national security strategy of the United States (hereinafter in this section referred to as a "national security strategy report”).

(2) The national security strategy report for any year shall be transmitted on the date on which the President submits to Congress the budget for the next fiscal year under section 1105 of title 31, United States Code.

(b) Each national security strategy report shall set forth the national security strategy of the United States and shall include a comprehensive description and discussion of the following:

(1) The worldwide interests, goals, and objectives of the United States that are vital to the national security of the United States.

(2) The foreign policy, worldwide commitments, and national defense capabilities of the United States necessary to deter aggression and to implement the national security strategy of the United States.

(3) The proposed short-term and long-term uses of the political, economic, military, and other elements of the national power of the United States to protect or promote the interests and achieve the goals and objectives referred to in paragraph (1).

(4) The adequacy of the capabilities of the United States to carry out the national security strategy of the United States, including an evaluation of the balance among the capabilities of all elements of the national power of the United States to support the implementation of the national security strategy.

(5) Such other information as may be necessary to help inform Congress on matters relating to the national security 8. Logan Act-Private Correspondence With Foreign

strategy of the United States. (c) Each

national security strategy report shall be transmitted in both a classified and an unclassified form.

? Subsec. (f) was added by sec. 1003 of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-690; 102 Stat. 4182).

8 50 U.S.C. 404a. Sec. 104 was added by sec. 603 of Public Law 99-433 (100 Stat. 1074).

Governments

Partial text of Public Law 80-772 (H.R. 3190), 62 Stat. 744; 18 U.S.C. 953, approved

June 25, 1948 (original legislation approved Jan. 30, 1799, 1 Stat. 613) AN ACT To revise, codify, and enact into positive law, Title 18 of the United States

Code, entitled “Crimes and Criminal Procedure”. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That Title 18 of the United States Code, entitled “Crimes and Criminal Procedure”, is hereby revised, codified, and enacted into positive law, and may be cited as "Title 18, U.S.C., §----", as follows:

Any citizen of the United States, wherever he may be, who, without authority of the United States, directly or indirectly commences or carries on any correspondence or intercourse with any foreign government or any officer or agent thereof, with intent to influence the measures or conduct of any foreign government or of any officer or agent thereof, in relation to any disputes or controversies with the United States, or to defeat the measures of the United States, shall be fined not more than $5,000 or imprisoned not more than three years, or both.

This section shall not abridge the right of a citizen to apply, himself or his agent, to any foreign government or the agents thereof for redress of any injury which he may have sustained from such government or any of its agents or subjects.

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