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through the National Park Service, to preserve for public use historic sites, buildings and objects of national significance for the inspiration and benefit of the people of the United States. Today, historic areas represent more than one-half of all of the areas of the nal Park System.

More recently, as the result of the creative work of the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission appointed in 1958, the national recreation areas added to the National Park System have accelerated in response to the burgeoning demands of our urban society for outdoor recreational opportunities.

Thus, the National Park System has evolved until today, in more than 270 areas, it is concerned with the preservation of natural wonders and scenic grandeur; the protection of places of scientific interest; the conmemoration of the places and the sources of our greatness and of our prosperity; and the management of natural and man-made environments, primarily, for healthful outdoor recreational opportunities.

Our Nation began with migrations, grew with migrations, and remains a Nation of people on the move.

Love of locality is one of the roots of social cohesion, according to Charles E. Merriam, who was one of our greatest political scientists. But in a new country like the United States, and in a society where one family in five moves each year, and where we have over 80 million automobiles, we have a hard time developing local roots of the kind familiar to Englishmen in Sussex, Frenchmen in Brittany, or Irishmen in County Cork. Our national parks like Yosemite and Grand Canyon, and our historic places like Independence Hall, the Lincoln Memorial, and Mount Vernon, take the place of local roots for tens of millions of mobile Americans. They give us the assurance of a "sense of place" expressive of our country that we can tie to permanently, wherever we move or live.

Many people go to the national parks and landmarks not simply to satisfy a need to get back to nature from crowded cities or for outdoor recreation. Many people go to the national parks and landmarks to strengthen their identity with their country. "Seeing is believing," and touching the Liberty Bell or setting foot in Yosemite Valley is worth a long trip to experience a sense of identity with America where it is unchanging. It isn't subtle. It's the deep human need to know "I was there" at Independence Hall or Yosemite Valley; and, as a result am a little more of an American. This experience is especially needed in these times of war, turmoil, and technological change.

Beyond our need to identify with the Nation is the urgent need to understand our place in the world environment and to join hands in doing our part to rescue it from impending ecological disaster. As Freeman Tilden put it, we need "to understand our place in nature and among men. we will reach this objective more quickly and we will heal our environsent more rapidly if we develop social cohesion "at home" by learning we

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED

AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1971

HEARINGS

BEFORE A

SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE
COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

NINETY-FIRST CONGRESS

SECOND SESSION

SUBCOMMITTEE ON DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES

JULIA BUTLER HANSEN, Washington, Chairman
MICHAEL J. KIRWAN, Ohio

BEN REIFEL, South Dakota
JOHN O. MARSH, JR., Virginia

JOSEPH M. McDADE, Pennsylvania
JOHN J. FLYNT, JR., Georgia

WENDELL WYATT, Oregon
DAVID R. OBEY, Wisconsin 1

GEORGE E. EVANS, Staf A88istant

1 Assigned to Subcommittee, February 20, 1970.

PART 3

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation

National Park Service

Office of the Secretary

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1970

43-215 O

COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

GEORGE H. MAHON, Texas, Chairman MICHAEL J. KIRWAN, Ohio

FRANK T. BOW, Ohio JAMIE L. WHITTEN, Mississippi

CHARLES R. JONAS, North Carolina GEORGE W. ANDREWS, Alabama

ELFORD A. CEDERBERG, Michigan JOHN J. ROONEY, New York

JOHN J. RHODES, Arizona ROBERT L. F. SIKES, Florida

WILLIAM E. MINSHALL, Ohio OTTO E, PASSMAN, Louisiana

ROBERT H. MICHEL, Illinois JOE L. EVINS, Tennessee

SILVIO O. CONTE, Massachusetts EDWARD P. BOLAND, Massachusetts

ODIN LANGEN, Minnesota WILLIAM H. NATCHER, Kentucky

BEN REIFEL, South Dakota DANIEL J. FLOOD, Pennsylvania

GLENN R. DAVIS, Wisconsin TOM STEED, Oklahoma

HOWARD W. ROBISON, New York GEORGE P. SHIPI Y, Illinois

GARNER E. SHRIVER, Kansas JOHN M, SLACK, West Virginia

JOSEPH M. MCDADE, Pennsylvania JOHN J. FLYNT, JR., Georgia

MARK ANDREWS, North Dakota NEAL SMITH, Iowa

LOUIS C. WYMAN, New Hampshire ROBERT N. GIAIMO, Connecticut

BURT L. TALCOTT, California JULIA BUTLER HANSEN, Washington CHARLOTTE T. REID, Illinois JOSEPH P. ADDABBO, New York

DONALD W. RIEGLE, JR., Michigan JOHN J. McFALL, California

WENDELL WYATT, Oregon W. R. HULL, JR., Missouri

JACK EDWARDS, Alabama
JEFFERY COHELAN, California

DEL CLAWSON, California
EDWARD J. PATTEN, New Jersey
CLARENCE D. LONG, Maryland
JOHN O. MARSH, JR., Virginia
SIDNEY R. YATES, Illinois
BOB CASEY, Texas
DAVID PRYOR, Arkansas
FRANK R. EVANS, Colorado
DAVID R. OBEY, Wisconsin

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DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES

APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1971

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 1970.

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

WITNESSES

GEORGE B. HARTZOG, JR., DIRECTOR
J. E. N. JENSEN, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR
EDWARD A. HUMMEL, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
C. P. MONTGOMERY, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
ERNEST A. CONNALLY, CHIEF, OFFICE OF ARCHEOLOGY AND HIS-

TORIC PRESERVATION
THEODOR R. SWEM, DIRECTOR, NATIONAL CAPITAL AND URBAN

PARK AFFAIRS RUSSELL E. DICKENSON, GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT, NATIONAL

CAPITAL PARKS GEORGE A. GOWANS, CHIEF, DIVISION OF PROGRAM PLANNING JOHN A. RUTTER, DIRECTOR, NORTHWEST REGION, SEATTLE,

WASH. FRED C. FAGERGREN, DIRECTOR, MIDWEST REGION, OMAHA, NEBR. DR. LESLIE L. GLASGOW, ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR FISH AND

WILDLIFE, PARKS AND MARINE RESOURCES RICHARD R. HITE, DIRECTOR OF BUDGET, OFFICE OF THE

SECRETARY

Mrs. HANSEN. The committee will come to order.

This afternoon we will hear the National Park Service. We are pleased to welcome back our old friend George Hartzog, the Director, as the principal witness.

GENERAL STATEMENT OF THE DIRECTOR

Mr. Hartzog, will you insert your general statement in the record and summarize it for us.

Mr. HARTZOG. Thank you, Madam Chairman. (Prepared statement follows:)

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