Report of the State Board of Forestry and of the State Park Committee of the State of Indiana, Volume 7

Front Cover
Wm. B. Burford, contractor for state printing and binding., 1907 - Forests and forestry

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 111 - Woodman, spare that tree ! Touch not a single bough ! In youth it sheltered me, And I'll protect it now. 'Twas my forefather's hand That placed it near his cot; There, woodman, let it stand, Thy ax shall harm it not.
Page 4 - Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners of Public Printing and Binding. FRED L. GEMMER, Secretary to the Governor, Filed in the office of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, May 15, 1907.
Page 111 - ... an idle boy I sought its grateful shade; In all their gushing joy Here, too, my sisters played. My mother kissed me here: My father pressed my hand — Forgive this foolish tear, But let that old oak stand! My heart-strings round thee cling, Close as thy bark, old friend! Here shall the wild-bird sing, And still thy branches bend. Old tree! the storm still brave! And, woodman, leave the spot; While I've a hand to save, Thy axe shall harm it not.
Page 111 - When but an idle boy, I sought its grateful shade; In all their gushing joy Here, too, my sisters played. My mother kissed me here; My father pressed my hand — Forgive this foolish tear, But let that old oak stand.
Page 114 - It is well that you should celebrate your Arbor Day thoughtfully, for within your lifetime the Nation's need of trees will become serious. We of an older generation can get along with what we have, though with growing hardship; but in your full manhood and womanhood you will want what nature...
Page 67 - Linn., formerly Q. digitata Sudw.) THE southern red oak, commonly known as red oak and referred to in books as Spanish oak, usually grows to a height of 70 to 80 feet and a diameter of 2 to 3 feet, though larger trees are not infrequently found.
Page 309 - The bark on young trees is light gray to brown and rather smooth, but as the tree grows older it breaks up into long, irregular plates or scales, which vary from light gray to almost black. The twigs are smooth and reddish brown, and the winter buds sharp-pointed. The tree attains a height of more than 100 feet and a diameter of 3 feet or more. The sap yields maple sugar and maple syrup. The leaves are 3 to 5 inches across, simple, opposite, with 3 to 5 pointed and sparsely toothed lobes, the divisions...
Page 111 - And wouldst thou hew it down? Woodman, forbear thy stroke! Cut not its earth-bound ties; Oh, spare that aged oak, Now towering to the skies!
Page 276 - In general, planting should be done as soon as possible after the frost is out of the ground, the exact period depending upon local climate and soil conditions.
Page 203 - ... loose, or rotten knots and defects that materially impair its strength, well manufactured, and suitable for good, substantial constructional purposes. Will allow slight variations in sawing, sound knots, pitch pockets, and sap on corners, one-third the width and one-half the thickness or its equivalent.

Bibliographic information