Sir Edward Seaward's Narrative of His Shipwreck, and Consequent Discovery of Certain Islands in the Caribbean Sea: With Details of His Residence There, and of Various Extraordinary and Highly Interesting Events in His Life, from the Year 1733 to 1749, as Written in His Own Diary, Volume 2

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J. & J. Harper, 1831
 

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Page 249 - Such is the plan by which it is intended to form an American Family Library, comprising all that is valuable in those branches of knowledge which most happily unite entertainment with instruction. The utmost care will be taken, not only to exclude whatever can have an injurious influence on the mind, but to embrace every thing calculated to strengthen the best and most salutary impressions. With these arrangements and facilities, the publishers flatter...
Page 249 - ... instruction. To render this Library still more worthy of patronage, the proprietors propose incorporating in it such works of interest and value as may appear in the various Libraries and Miscellanies now preparing in Europe, particularly the " National" and the " Edinburgh Cabinet
Page 249 - The volumes now before the public may be confidently appealed to as proofs of zeal on the part of the publishers to present to their readers a series of productions, which, as they are connected, not with ephemeral, but with permanent subjects, may, years hence as well as now, be consulted for lively amusement as well as solid instruction.
Page 249 - Every distinct subject will in general be comprehended in one volume, or at most in three volumes, which may form either a portion of the series or a complete work by itself; and each volume will be embellished with appropriate engravings. The entire series will be the production of authors of eminence, who have acquired celebrity by their literary labours, and whose...
Page 249 - DR. JoHNSoN. THE proprietors of the Family Library feel themselves stimulated to increased exertions by the distinguished favour with which it has already been received. The volumes now before the public may be confidently appealed to as proofs of zeal on the part of the publishers to present to their readers a series of productions, which, as they are connected, not with ephemeral, but with permanent subjects, may, years hence as well as...
Page 249 - Books that you may carry to the fire, and hold readily in your hand, are the most useful after all. A man will often look at them, and be tempted to go on, when he would have been frightened at books of a larger size, and of a more erudite appearance.

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