The Nature of Consciousness

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Oct 11, 2001 - Philosophy - 245 pages
In The Nature of Consciousness, Mark Rowlands develops an innovative account of the nature of phenomenal consciousness, one that has significant consequences for attempts to find a place for it in the natural order. The most significant feature of consciousness is its dual nature: consciousness can be both the directing of awareness and that upon which awareness is directed. Rowlands offers a clear and philosophically insightful discussion of the main positions in this fast-moving debate, and argues that the phenomenal aspects of conscious experience are aspects that exist only in the directing of experience towards non-phenomenal objects, a theory that undermines reductive attempts to explain consciousness in terms of what is not conscious. His book will be of interest to a wide range of readers in the philosophy of mind and language, psychology and cognitive science.
 

Contents

1 The problem of phenomenal consciousness
1
2 Consciousness and supervenience
26
3 The explanatory gap
51
4 Consciousness and higherorder experience
75
5 Consciousness and higherorder thoughts
101
6 The structure of consciousness
122
7 What it is like
148
mistakes about the way things seem
178
9 Consciousness and representation
197
10 Consciousness and the natural order
216
Bibliography
236
Index
242
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Mark Rowlands is Lecturer in Philosophy at University College, Cork. His publications include Supervenience and Materialism (1995), Animal Rights (1998), The Body in Mind (1999) and numerous journal articles.

Bibliographic information