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for December, 1783.

WHEN

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Poetical Efrays, &c.
Imitation of Horace, Ode 34.

Bespeak a vaft eternal mind ;
1.

Whose power to u8 18 not con

fin'd.
THEN in the paths of youth I

trod,
With little rev'rence for my God;

He bends, and at his sovereiga

nod
And di believed the power divine,
Who Nature form’d by wisdom's

The trembling earth believes &

God;
lipe ;
Although from depths of science

Old ocean in his deepest beds,
taught

With terror hides his thousand heads, A force of reas'ning and of thought,

The realms of pain, though far they Yet ftill I walk'd a learöed fool,

lie, By knowledge blind and mad by

Beyond the ken of Atrongeft eye,

Are naked to the omniscient's fight, rule. II.

And darkness beams to him as Be this my wish to gain the more,

: .light,

VI.
Where truth commands that I a-
dore,

From north to south, from east to
With humble heart the great first

wert, caure,

A God appears through all confeft; Whoaêts on earth by general laws,

Where are the sun performs his

round
Add as my skiff is paffing down
Life's rapid fiream which time rolls

To wide creation's utmoft bound,

His eflence in the lifeless frame, May bleit devotion's sacred gale

Breathes through the whole a vital

Aame;
Waft it along with eafies fail.
III.

Dwells in the lofty mountain gale,
How great that God, prime fource of

Or fans the zephyr of the vale. day,

VII. Who gives the burning lightnings The fiat's paft--the proud behold, way,

No more they blaze in pomp of gold. And bids the thunder dreadful roll,

The scepired King his crown re-
From skies serene to make the pole.

figns,
Hail ever glorious, hallowed name,
Whose mandate wraps a world in

The Dave in royal grandeur Mines.

Thus changes life, and wears away, fame,

The vision of a winter's day
Whose frowns pervade creation

No morning sun Mall always burn, through,

But good and evil take their torn.
Whose (miles her withered charms

VIII.
IV.

Oh give me then, who form'd this
In dreadlul pomp along the skies,

ball,
Swift over earth his chariot dies; As sportive fortune plays with all,
Thick lightnings Aafhing in his train, And dances here or trips it there,
Proclaim it'Almighty's awful reigo ; Unfix'd as water, light as air---
Whilft far away to climes unknown, Firm in my hopes, unmov'd to
The thuaders roar from round the

ftand,
throne,

And wait the bounties of thy hand,

Whore

on,

renew.

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For the BosTON MAGAZINE. We'll for a better flate

prepare, If tbe following verses may

And chear our hearts with hopes of

Heav'a. merit a place in your Magi-" Thus will we love, and live serene, zine, ibey are at your fer

'Till tir'd of these vain, earthly vice.

toys,

And sick of the infipid scene, By a Lady, on the absence of We'll die to tatte immortal joys. ber Husband.

Y. 2. LPHONSO's gone! diftra&ing

fears My constant heart with sorrows

The Birth of Cupid. fill,

TERE in the bow'r of beauty My eyes shall never cease from tears, HERE Nor mall this throbbing heart be

newly Thorn,

Let fancy sit, and fing how love was ft:ll :

born; How long in Belgia's gloomy clime, Muft I be rôbb'd of all his charms?

Wrapt upin roses, zephyr found the

child, How long will low, unp tying time, Keep my Alphonso from my

In Flora's cheek when first the zod.

ders (mill'd! Shorten ye' ling'ring 'hours your Nurs'd on the bosom of the beaustay,

teous Spring, In pity to a lover's pain,

O'er her wbite breast he spread his Quick, fake the winter months away: On killes red, and filver drops of

purple wing; And bring the blooming spring

dew,' again. Hear ftormy winds a wretch's cries, The little wanton into Cupid grew,

Depriv'd of all her soul holds dear, Then arm'd bis hand with glitt'ring Fly (wift, begone, and waft these (parks of fire, fighs,

And tipt his shining arrows with deTo my Alphonso's lift'ning ear:

fire ; Tell him Almeria is a prey,

Hence joy arose upon the wings of To pining grief and anxious çares,

wind, In sadness the consumes the day,

And hope presents, the lover always And spends the gloomy night in.

kind.

Dispair creates a rival for our fears, But hop kind winds, I would not And tender picy foftens into itars.

grieve
My dear Alphonfo's gentle heart,
T'would him of every joy bereave,

Should you Almeria's grief impart. Dr. Doddridge, to his Wife'.
Then tell him not that I complain,
At midnight in fome lonely shade,

Boom.
Totwinkling
Aars I'll speak my painy OPEL mye weary lead to reR;

PEN, open, ,
And call religion to my aid.
Come and afli me, power divine ! Soft, and warm, and sweet, and fai.

To sooth the cyrant love to rest, Balmy antidote of care.
To thy ble ft guidance I resign Fragrant source of lure delight :

These reftlers passions in my breast. Downy couch of welcome night,
Thy friendly precepts will not drive, Ornament of rifing day ;

My loved Alphonso from my heart, Always conftant, always gay. Nor us of nuptial bliss deprive, In this gentle calm retreat When we shall meet no more to All the train of graces meet. part.

Truth, and innocence, and love, We'll hand in hand together thare From this temple ne'er remove. The peaceful pleasures thou hast Sacred virtue's worthief fhrine ! givin.

Art thou bere, and art thou mine !

Wond.

tears ;

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Poetical Ejays.

נן

XIII.
Around the globe, may fa&ion, par.

y pride,
With bigot zeal, no more gigantick

ftride. Bat malice, Mander, guile, forever

ceale, And nations, kiodreds, topgues,

unite in PEACE. Bofon, December, 1783.

Shall hy from all nations the beft of

mankind; Here grateful to Heaven with tran

sport fall brings
Their incense more fragrant than
odors of spring.

IV.
Nor less fhall thy fair opes to glory

ascend,
And genius and beauty, in harmony

blend; The graces of form thall awake pore

defire, And the charms of the soul Atill enli

ven the fire :

Columbia.

1.

COLUMBIA/ Columbial to glo. Their sweetness up mingled, their man

1

woe.

ry arise,

Ders refia'd, The queen of the world, and the child

And virtue's bright image in famp'd of the skies ;

on tbe mind; Thy genius commands théc with

With peace and soft raptore, fhall raptures behold,

teach life to glow, While ages on ages thy splendors upfold

And light up a smile in the afpe& of Thy reign is the last and the noble

V. of time, Mof fruitful thy soil, moft inviting

Thy fleets to all regions thy powe

er Mall display, thy clime : Let the crimes of the east ne'er en

The nations admire, and the ocean crimson thy name,

obey ; Be freedom, and science, and virtue

Each More to thy glory its tribute un

fold, by fame.

And the cast and the south give their 11. To conquest and laughter, Jet Eu

spices of gold : tope afpire,

As the day spring unbounded the Whela nations in blood, and wrap And earth's little kingdoms before

splendors fall fow, cites in fire ;

thee thall bow ; Thy beroes the rights of mankind Mall defend,

While the eo figns of union,in triumph

vofurl'd, Andtriomph pursue them, and glory Hufh the tumult of war, and peace attend:

to the world. A world is thy realm, for a world be

thy laws, Enlarged as thine empire,

mod jul

Thus, as down a lone valley with

cedars o'er (pread, as thy cause ; On (reedom's broad bafis that empire From war's dread confufion 1 penExtend with the main, and dissolve The gloom from the face of fair hawith the skies.

ven retir'd,

The winds ceas'd to murmur, the III. Pair Science her gates to thy fons Perfumes as of Eden Powd Pweetly

thunders expir'd: And the eal see thy moro hide the

along,

And a voice, as of angles, enchante New bards and new fages untivald

ingly fung;

Columbia Columbia I to glory To fame unextinguitd, when time

arise,

The queen of the world, and the To thee the last refuge for virfue de.

child of the skies. ligado

For

VI.

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For the BOSTON MAGAZINE. We'll for a better flate prepare, If the following verses may

And chear our hearts with hopes

Heav'n. merit a place in your Magi-" Thus will we love, and live serene, zine, they are at your fer- 'Till tir'd of these vain, earth vice.

toys,

And lick of the in lipid (cene, By a Lady, on the absence of We'll die to tante immortal joys

ber Husband. LPHONSO's gone! diftra&ting My conftant heart with sorrows

Tbe Birth of Cupid. fil, My eyes thall never cease from tears, Here in thič, bow?r, of be Nor hall this throbbing heart be ft:ll :

Let fancy sit, and fing how love

born; How long in Belgia's gloomy clime, Muft I be robb’d of all his charms? Wrapt upin roses, zepbyr foun

child, How long will. Now, unpitying time, Keep my Alphonso from my

In Flora's cheek when first the

ders (mill'd! Shorten ye" ling'ring 'hours your

Nuri'd on the borom of the ftay,

teous (pring, In pity to a lover's pain,

O'er her white breast he. (pre Quick, fake the winter months away, purple wing; And bring the blooming spring On kisses sed, and filver di

dew, Hear formy winds a wretch's cries, The little wanton into Cupi

Deprived of all her soul holds dear, Then arm'd bin hand with & Fiy swift, begone, and waft these (parks of fire, fighs,

And tipt his Mining To my Alphonso's lif’ning ear:

fire ; Tell him Almeria is a prey,

Hence joy arose upon To pining grief and anxious çares, Io sadness the consumes the day, And hope presents, the love And spends the gloomy night in

kind.

Difpair creates a rival for ou But sop kind winds, I would not And tender pity fofteas iot

grieve My dear Alphonso's gentle heart, T'would him of every joy bereave, Should you Almeria's grief impart. Dr. Doddridge, to bi At midnight in some lonely shade,

Bojom. Totwinkling Aars I'll speak my painy Lull my weary head Come and all me, power divine ! Soft, and warm, and swee

To looth the tyrant love to reft, Balmy antidote of care. To thy ble ft guidance I refiga Fragrant source of fure del

These reftlers passions in my breast. Downy couch of welcome a Thy friendly precepts will not drive, Ornament of rising day ;

My lov'd Alphonso from my heart, Always conftant, always Nor us of nuptial bliss deprive, In this gentle calm retrea When we shall meet no more to All the train of graces me 2. part.

Truth, and innocence, an We'll hand in hand together share From this temple ne'er re The peaceful pleafures" thou hast Sacred virtue's wớrthieft giv'n.

Art thou bere, and art i

arrows

the

wind,

tears ;

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Wonder, gratitude, and joy,
Bieft vic Grudes ! employ
Every moment, every tho't ;
Cronds of care are loog forgot.
Open, opeo, lovely breaft,
Loll my weary head to rest.
Calar, fill thy hining throne:
A dobler seat I call my own.
Here I reiga with boundless (way,
Here I triumph oight and day,
Spacious empire, glorious pow'r!
M.de of inexhauñed store !
Let the wretches love to roam,
Joy and I can live at home.
Open, open, lovely breast,
Lull my weary head to rest.

Take him soon at his word, tho' you
blush, yet be kind.

IV. -
Expect not a crowd of admirers to

see,
Rich, handsome and courtly, and all

they shou'd be ; The times are so bad, and so chang'd

is our lot, That a man that's worth having is

hard to be got: Choose quick, or you'l rue it the rest

of your lives; You may Aourith as toasts, but you'l

never be wives.

Advice to the Fair.

An answer to the Riddle. A new song set to Music. THAT

HAT up or down, it's “ ftillla

bed,” (Written during the late War.)

Explains the Riddle, Quantum's

raid. I. If you're not too proud for a word

Translation of Blande Puer. ks your choice nic a husband, girls, be Gore naty pobokel in lefter hend, What with maqning our ships and Thyself be Cupid, God of Love. prote&tiog our shore,

And she a Venus Mine. You cannot have lovers as once by the score,

Answer to tbe Rebus. yee wilt to be married, your pride ADAMS is the lattint, by many What a smile can procure, do not loose MERI,DIAN's a phrase often used by a frown

for Noon, II.

A CANN, full of liquor (when dry) The time it has been, it will ne'er be

will serve me, again,

AMERICA's the place, that's both When a legion of lovers, I had in my Happy and Free. train,

1. D. They were pleas'd with my fing song, Town. Dock, December 12, 1783.

I laugh'd at them all; For one was too thort and another too tall,

A Solution to the Bill of Fare Or too plump, or to fender, too young or too old,

for Christmas, in our last And this was too bachful, and that

number. was too bold.

1. A Pig 2. A Calve's head turIII.

tle'd. 3. A Tongue, garnished with All you who're in bloom, and who box. 4. Gammon, garnited with Hymen implore,

thyme. Goce love may not wait till the wars Vegetables. 5. Cellery. 6. Beats. are all o'er,

7. Carrots. 8. Greens. 9; Pirkles. Resemble the willow, be gentle and Deserts.

10. Tarts.

II. Flum. bead, mery. 12. Whip Syllabubş..

13Take pains for a lover as you wou'd Pears. for a friend,

Drink.
14. Porter.

15. Becr. Look once at his person, but twice at 16. Water. 17. Arack. 18. Spirit. his mind,

AMELIA. K

At

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