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8 USC 1151.

WHEREAS the Federation of Malaya was on August 31, 1957, granted independence by the Government of the United Kingdom within the British Commonwealth of Nations; and

WHEREAS the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Commerce, and the Attorney General have reported to the President that in accordance with the duty imposed and the authority conferred upon them by section 201(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, they jointly have made the determination provided for and computed under the provisions of section 201(a) of the said Act, and have fixed, in accordance therewith, an immigration quota for the Federation of Malaya as hereinafter set forth:

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, President Immigration quota. of the United States of America, acting under and by virtue of the

authority vested in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, do hereby proclaim and make known that the annual quota of the quota area hereinafter designated has been determined in accordance with the law to be, and shall be, as follows:

8 USC 1151.

of

Federation Malaya.

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Area No.

Quota area

Quota

89 Federation of Malaya..

100

66 Stat. 163.
8 USC 1101 note.

66 Stat. c36.

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The establishment of an immigration quota for any quota area is solely for the purpose of compliance with the pertinent provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act and is not to be considered as having any signficance extraneous to such purpose.

Proclamation No. 2980 of June 30, 1952, entitled "Immigration Quotas”, is amended by the addition of the immigration quota for the Federation of Malaya as set forth in this proclamation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed. DONE at the City of Washington this tenth day of October in the

year

of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-seven and of (SEAL] the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-second.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER
By the President:
CHRISTIAN A. HERTER,

Acting Secretary of State.

SECOND WORLD METALLURGICAL CONGRESS

October 10, 1957

(No. 3207)

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

71 Stat. 565.

WHEREAS the Congress of the United States, by joint resolution approved August 31, 1957, has extended its official welcome to the overseas metal scientists who will attend the Second World Metallurgical Congress to be held at Chicago, Illinois, from November 2 to November 8, 1957, under the sponsorship of the American Society for Metals; and

WHEREAS the world's growing demand for metal emphasizes the need for the conservation of our present resources and for the discovery and development of new sources of supply; and

WÀEREAS the meeting of the Second World Metallurgical Congress will encourage the free exchange of scientific information

Second World Metallurgical Congress.

among the metallurgists of the world and stimulate the search for minerals and for improved techniques in the field of metallurgy; and

WHEREAS the joint resolution requests the President to grant recognition to the World Metallurgical Congress and to the American Society for Metals for its sponsorship of this world gathering of metallurgical scientists, and to call upon officials and agencies of the Government to assist and cooperate with such congress:

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, President of the United States of America, do hereby extend recognition to the Second World Metallurgical Congress and commend the American Society for Metals for initiating and sponsoring this meeting. I also extend the welcome of this Government to the Congress and to the scientists attending its proceedings, and I request that all Federal departments and agencies assist and cooperate with the Second World Metallurgical Congress as occasion may warrant.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed. DONE at the City of Washington this tenth day of October in the

year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-seven, and (SEAL) of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-second.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER
By the President:
CHRISTIAN A. HERTER,

Acting Secretary of State.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT CENTENNIAL YEAR

OCTOBER 27, 1957-OCTOBER 27, 1958

October 22, 1957

(No. 3208)

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Theodore Roosevelt loved America with impassioned devotion and served her greatly in public office and as a private citizen. As President of the United States, his name is associated with epochal readjustments in the relations of government and industry, with the policy of conservation which he established, with the building of the Panama Canal, and with the peace that ended the Russo-Japanese War. His appeals to conscience sank deep into the American heart and mind and wrought enduring changes.

A man of rich gifts in many fields, at home alike in the world of books, the world of politics, and in the wild waste spaces where adventure called, he was historian and ranchman, huntsman and naturalist, Rough Rider, preacher, family man, and explorer. His contemporaries cherished him as a two-fisted fighter who loved life, loved people, feared nobody, and was as much at ease with kings as with cowboys, a wielder alike of the winged phrase and of the sledge hammer, a dangerous antagonist, and an unforgetting, unforgettable friend.

Upon us who stand outside the circle of time in which men felt his personal spell, Theodore Roosevelt exercises a different and, perhaps, a deeper power. We see, and claim for our own, the word, the spirit, and the example that survive for us in this teacher of the principles underlying democratic institutions--this summoner to participation in the procedures of free government, adjuring us, as he entreated the men and women of his own time, to accept the responsibilities of free

Theodore Roosevelt Centennial Year, 19571938.

71 Stat. 617.

citizenship. He was a man on fire for his country, who kindles fires in our hearts. He was a prophet, calling upon us to fulfill our responsibilities not only for the sake of our own Nation and people but for the sake of those, throughout the world, who look to us for hope, inspiration, and leadership.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, President of the United States of America, in consonance with a request made by the Congress in its joint resolution approved by me on September 4, 1957 (Public Law 85–297), do hereby call upon the American people to observe the one hundredth anniversary of Theodore Roosevelt's birth throughout the centennial vear beginning October 27, 1957, by appropriate activities and ceremonies, by the study of his life and teachings, and above all, by individual, personal rededication to those responsibilities of American citizenship which he so zestfully fulfilled.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed. DONE at the City of Washington this 22nd day of October in the

year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-seven, and [SEAL of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-second.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER
By the President:
John Foster DULLES,

Secretary of State.

IMPOSING A FEE ON IMPORTS OF ALMONDS

October 23, 1957

(No. 3209)

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

62 Stat. 1248.

WHEREAS, pursuant to section 22 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act, as amended (7 U.S.C. 624), the Secretary of Agriculture advised me there was reason to believe that shelled almonds and blanched, roasted, or otherwise prepared or preserved almonds are practically certain to be imported into the United States under such conditions and in such quantities as to render or tend to render ineffective, or materially interfere with, the marketing-order program of the Department of Agriculture, under Federal Marketing Order No. 9, with respect to almonds, or to reduce substantially the amount of products processed in the United States from domestically produced almonds with respect to which such program of the Department of Agriculture is being undertaken; and

WHEREAS, on June 27, 1957, under the authority of the said section 22, I caused the United States Tariff Commission to make an investigation with respect to this matter; and

WHEREAS, in accordance with the said section 22, as implemented by Executive Order No. 7233 of November 23, 1935, the said Commission has made such investigation and has reported to me its findings and recommendations made in connection therewith; and

WHEREAS, on the basis of the said investigation and report of the Tariff Commission, I find that shelled almonds and blanched, roasted, or otherwise prepared or preserved almonds (not including almond paste) are practically certain to be imported into the United States during the period from October 1, 1957, to September 30, 1958, both dates inclusive, under such conditions and in such quantities as

7 CSC 624.

7 ('SC 624.

Almonds.
Import fee.

7 USC 624.

to render or tend to render ineffective, or materially interfere with, the said program of the Department of Agriculture; and

WHEREAS I find and declare that the import fee hereinafter proclaimed is shown by such investigation of the said Commission to be necessary in order that the entry, or withdrawal from warehouse, for consumption of the said products will not render or tend to render ineffective, or materially interfere with, the said program of the Department of Agriculture:

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, President of the United States of America, acting under and by virtue of the authority vested in me by the said section 22 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act, as amended, do proclaim that shelled almonds and blanched, roasted, or otherwise prepared or preserved almonds (not including almond paste) entered, or withdrawn from warehouse, for consumption during the period from October 23, 1957, to September 30, 1958, both dates inclusive, in excess of an aggregate quantity of five million pounds, shall be subject to a fee of ten cents per pound but not more than fifty per centum ad valorem. Such fee shall be in addition to any other duties imposed upon the importation of such almonds.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed. DONE at the City of Washington this twenty-third day of October

in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-seven, (SEAL] and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-second.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER
By the President:
JOHN FOSTER DULLES,

Secretary of State.

THANKSGIVING DAY, 1957

November 8, 1957

(No. 3210)

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

At the autumnal season of the year our hearts move us to follow the wise and reverent custom, inaugurated by our Pilgrim Fathers more than three centuries ago, of setting aside one special day for expressions of gratitude to å merciful Providence for the blessings bestowed upon us.

It behooves us to dwell upon the deep religious convictions of those who formed our Nation out of a wilderness, and to recall that our leaders throughout the succeeding generations have relied upon Almighty God for vision and strength of purpose.

As a Nation we have prospered; we are enjoying the fruit of our land and the product of our toil; we are making progress in our efforts to translate our national ideals into living realities; and we are at peace with the world, working toward that day when the benefits of freedom and justice shall be secured for all mankind.

For such blessings let us be devoutly thankful, and at the same time let us be sensitive and responsive to the obligations which such great mercies entail.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, President of the United States of America, having in mind the joint resolution of Congress approved December 26, 1941, which designates the

Thanksgiving Day, 1957.

55 Stat. 862.
5 USC 87b.

fourth Thursday in November of each year as Thanksgiving Day, do hereby call upon our people to observe Thursday, November 28, 1957, as a day of national thanksgiving. On that day let all of us, in accordance with our hallowed custom, foregather in our respective places of worship or in our homes and offer up prayers of thanks for our manifold blessings. Let the happiness which stems from family reunions on Thanksgiving Day be tempered with compassion and inspired by an active concern for those less fortunate in our own country and in other lands; and let us ask God's continuing help and guidance in our conduct, both as individuals and as a Nation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed. DONE at the City of Washington this eighth day of November

in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-seven, (SEAL] and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-second.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER
By the President:
John FOSTER DULLES,

Secretary of State.

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69 Stat. 165.

64 Stat. B303.

64 Stat. B146.

1. WHEREAS, pursuant to the authority vested in the President by the Constitution and the statutes, including section 350 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1351), on October 10, 1949 he entered into a trade agreement providing for the accession to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (61 Stat. (Pts. 5 and 6) A7, all, and A2051) of certain foreign countries, including the Kingdom of Denmark and the Kingdom of Sweden, which trade agreement consists of the Annecy Protocol of Terms of Accession to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, dated October 10 1949, including the annexes thereto (64 Stat. (Pt. 3) B141):

2. WHEREAS Schedule XX in Annex A of the said trade agreement for accession became a schedule to the said General Agreement in accordance with paragraph 3 of the said trade agreement for accession:

3. WHEREAS, by Proclamation No. 2867 of December 22, 1949 (3 CFR, 1949 Supp., 55), the President proclaimed such modification of existing duties and other import restrictions of the United States and such continuance of existing customs or excise treatment of articles imported into the United States as were then found to be required or appropriate to carry out the said trade agreement for accession, which proclamation has been supplemented by several proclamations, including Proclamation No. 2884, of April 27, 1950 (3 CFR, 1950 Supp., 28);

4. WHEREAS the first item 412 in Part I of the said Schedule XX reads in pertinent part as follows:

64 Stat. A380.

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64 Stat. A399.

64 Stat. A 401.

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