Page images
PDF
EPUB

And what wul ye leive to your bairns

and your wife, Whan ye gang ovir the sea O?” "The warldis room, late them beg thrae' life,

Mither, mither, The warldis room, late them beg thrae

life, For thame nevir mair wul I see 0.”

7. "And what wul ye leive to your ain mither deir,

Edward, Edward? And what wul ye leive to your ain

mither deir?
My deir son, now tell me 0.”
"The curse of hell frae me sall ye beir,

Mither, mither,
The curse of hell frae me sall ye beir,

Sic counseils ye gave to me 0.”

KEMP OWYNE

I. Her mother died when she was young,

Which gave her cause to make great

moan; Her father married the warst woman

That ever lived in Christendom.

2. She served her with foot and hand,

In every thing that she could dee,2 Till once, in an unlucky time,

She threw her in ower Craigy's sea.

3. Says, "Lie you there, dove Isabel,

And all my sorrows lie with thee; Till Kemp Owyne come ower the sea, And borrow

you

with kisses three Let all the warld do what they will,

6. Her breath was strang, her hair was

lang, And twisted was about the tree, And with a swing she came about:

"Come to Craigy's sea, and kiss

with me.

7. "Here is a royal belt," she cried,

“That I have found in the green sea; And while your body it is on,

Drawn shall your blood never be; But if you touch

me,

tail or fin, I vow my belt your death shall be."

8. He stepped in, gave her a kiss,

The royal belt he brought him wi; Her breath was strang, her hair was

lang, And twisted twice about the tree, And with a swing she came about: “Come to Craigy's sea, and kiss

with me.

9. "Here is a royal ring,” she said,

“That I have found in the green sea; And while your finger it is on,

Drawn shall your blood never be; But if you touch me, tail or fin,

I swear my ring your death shall be." 10. He stepped in, gave her a kiss,

The royal ring he brought him wi; Her breath was strang, her hair was

lang, And twisted ance about the tree, And with a swing she came about: Come to Craigy's sea, and kiss

with me.

Oh borrowed shall you never be!”

4. Her breath grew strang, her hair grew

lang, And twisted thrice about the tree, And all the people, far and near,

Thought that a savage beast was

II. "Here is a royal brand," she said,

“That I have found in the green sea; And while your body it is on,

Drawn shall your blood never be;
But if you touch me, tail or fin,
I swear my brand your death shall

be.”

she.

5. These news did come to Kemp Owyne,

Where he lived, far beyond the sea; He hasted him to Craigy's sea,

And on the savage beast lookd he. 1 through.

? do.

12. He stepped in, gave her a kiss,

The royal brand he brought him wi; Her breath was sweet, her hair grew

short, And twisted nane about the tree, And smilingly she came about,

As fair a woman as fair could be.

3 rescue.

[blocks in formation]

10. O lang, lang may the ladies stand,

Wi thair gold kems in their hair, Waiting for thair ain deir lords,

For they'll se thame na mair. 1 above.

before.

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

11. But often words they breeden bale;17

That parted Robin and John;
John is gone to Barn[e]sdale,

The gates 18 he knowes eche one.

12. And when hee came to Barnesdale,

Great heavinesse there hee hadd; He ffound two of his fellowes

Were slaine both in a slade,19

[ocr errors]

3. “Me thought they did mee beate

and binde,
And tooke my bowe mee froe;
If I bee Robin alive in this lande,
I'le be wrocken 10 on both them

towe.4. "Sweavens11 are swift, master," quoth

John, "As the wind that blowes ore a hill; Ffor if itt be never soe lowde this

night,

To-morrow it may be still.” 5. "Buskel2 yee, bownel yee, my merry

men all, Ffor John shall goe with mee; For I'le goe seeke yond wight yeomen

In greenwood where the bee." 1 impatient. ? if.

13. And Scarlett a-ffoote flyinge was,

Over stockes and stone,
For the sheriffe with seven score men
Fast after him is

gone.

14. “Yett one shoote l'le shoote,” sayes

Litle John, “With Crist his might and mayne; I'le make yond fellow that flyes soe

3 stable. thickets. 5 beautiful

6 copses: 1 woodlack

8 of Linn (“a stock ballad locality”).
10 avenged.

11 dreams.
12 make ready.
13 dress yourselves.

14 they.

fast

To be both glad and ffaine." 16 horse-bide. 16 wonderful.

18 valley.

>

. sturdy.

17 evil.

18 ways.

[blocks in formation]

20. “Thou shalt be drawen by dale and

downe," quoth the sheriffe, "And hanged hye on a hill;' “But thou may ffayle," quoth Litle

7

John,
“If itt be Christ's owne will."

21. Let us leave talking of Litle John,

For hee is bound fast to a tree, And talke of Guy and Robin Hood

In the green woode where they bee.

29. “Leade on, good ffellow," sayd Sir

Guye, “Lead

on,

I doe bidd thee:"
"Nay, by my faith," quoth Robin

Hood,
“The leader thou shalt bee.”

22. How these two yeomen together they 30. The first good shoot that Robin ledd, mett,

Did not shoote an inch the pricke Under the leaves of lyne,

ffroe; To see what marchandise they made Guy was an archer good enoughe, Even at that same time.

But he cold neere shoote soe.

23. “Good morrow, good fellow," quoth

Sir Guy;
“Good morrow, good ffellow," quoth

hee;
“Methinkes by this bow thou beares

in thy hand,
A good archer thou seems to bee.”

? made ready. s help. * dealing.

31. The second shoote Sir Guy shott,

He shott within the garlande;
But Robin Hoode shott it better than

hee,
For he clove the good pricke-

wande.

1 yew.

5 time not fixed.

6 rods.

i apart.

32. “Gods blessing on thy heart!” sayes

Guye, "Goode ffellow, thy shooting is

goode; For an thy hart be as good as thy

hands, Thou were better than Robin Hood.

40. Robin thought on Our Lady deere,

And soone leapt up againe,
And thus he came with an awkwarde*

stroke;
Good Sir Guy hee has slayne.

41. He tooke Sir Guys head by the hayre,

And sticked itt on his bowes end: “Thou hast beene traytor all thy liffe,

Which thing must have an ende."

33. "Tell me thy name, good ffellow,'

quoth Guy,
"Under the leaves of lyne:”
“Nay, by my faith," quoth good

Robin,
“Till thou have told me thine.”

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

34. “I dwell by dale and downe," quoth

Guye, "And I have done many a curst

turne; And he that calles me by my right

name,

Calles me Guye of good Gysborne." 35. “My dwelling is in the wood,” sayes

Robin; “By thee I set right nought; My name is Robin Hood of Barnes

dale,

Affellow thou has long sought.” 36. He that had neither beene a kithe nor

kin Might have seene a full fayre sight, To see how together these yeomen

went, With blades both browne and

bright; 37. To have seene how these yeomen to

gether foug[ht] Two howers of a summer's day; Itt was neither Guy nor Robin Hood

That ffettled them to flye away. 38. Robin was reacheles on’a roote,

And stumbled at that tyde,
And Guy was quicke and nimble

with-all,

And hitt him ore the left side. 39. “Ah, deere Lady!” sayd Robin

Hoode, “Thou art both mother and may!3 I thinke it was never mans destinye

To dye before his day." prepared.

46. Robin sette Guyes horne to his mouth,

A lowd blast in it he did blow;
That beheard the sheriffe of Notting-

ham,
As he leaned under a lowe.”

47. “Hearken! hearken!” sayd the sheriffe,

"I heard noe tydings but good;
For yonder I heare Sir Guyes horne

blowe,
For he hath slaine Robin Hoode.

48. “For yonder I heare Sir Guyes horne

blow,
Itt blowes soe well in tyde,
For yonder comes that wighty yeo-

man,
Cladd in his capull-hyde.

2 careless of.

3 maid.

* backhanded.

6 bill.

« PreviousContinue »