Loneliness: Human Nature and the Need for Social Connection

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2009 - Psychology - 317 pages
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University of Chicago social neuroscientist John T. Cacioppo unveils his pioneering research on the startling effects of loneliness: a sense of isolation or social rejection disrupts not only our thinking abilities and will power but also our immune systems, and can be as damaging as obesity or smoking. A blend of biological and social science, this book demonstrates that, as individuals and as a society, we have everything to gain, and everything to lose, in how well or how poorly we manage our need for social bonds.

 

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User Review  - PeskyLibrary - LibraryThing

We often see loneliness as a weakness. People who are lonely are seen as being needy because they cannot function well without social interaction. However in Loneliness by John T. Cacioppo we see that ... Read full review

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User Review  - Suva - LibraryThing

Cacioppo and Patrick attack the received idea that social connection and empathy are the luxuries we annex onto our workaday existence, and instead show them as essential for human life. Through ... Read full review

Contents

acknowledgments
PART ONE
CHAPTER ONE
CHAPTER TWO
CHAPTER THREE
CHAPTER FOUR
CHAPTER FIVE
CHAPTER SIX
CHAPTER EIGHT
CHAPTER NINE
CHAPTER TEN
CHAPTER ELEVEN
PART THREE
CHAPTER TWELVE
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
CHAPTER FOURTEEN

PART TWO
CHAPTER SEVEN
notes
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

John T. Cacioppo (1951--2018) was a psychology professor at the University of Chicago and director of the university's Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience. He was the author of more than a dozen books, including Loneliness: Human Nature and the Need for Social Connections.

William Patrick, former editor for science and medicine at Harvard University Press, is editor in chief of the Journal of Life Sciences. He lives in Ipswich, Massachusetts.

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