Killer Whales: The Natural History and Genealogy of Orcinus Orca in British Columbia and Washington

Front Cover
Watching killer whales in the wild in British Columbia and Washington state has become a popular recreational activity in the last decade. Nothing quite matches the thrill of witnessing a pod of these immense creatures cutting through the waters of Johnstone Strait or listening to their strident underwater calls to each other in their own dialect.
 

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Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments
8
Our Changing Relationship with the Killer Whale
11
Sidebars
12
The Development of Our Study
13
Natural History of the Killer Whale
16
Resident Killer Whale Societies
23
Watching Killer Whales
28
Catalogue of Resident Killer Whales
41
Conservation Concerns and Future Prospects for Killer Whales
97
Glossary
101
Bibliography
102
Other Resources
103
Photographic Credits
104
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

The authors are active researchers who are widely regarded as theworld's foremost authorities on killer whales. John K.B.Ford is former head of marine mammal research at the VancouverAquarium Marine Science Centre and an adjunct professor in theDepartment of Zoology and the Marine Mammal Research Unit at theUniversity of British Columbia. He is currently marine mammal biologistat the Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B.C. Graeme M.Ellis is a senior marine mammal technician at the PacificBiological Station, Nanaimo, B.C. Kenneth C. Balcombis director of the Center for Whale Research, Friday Harbor,Washington.

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