Integrated Pest Management

Front Cover
D. Dent
Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 31, 1995 - Science - 356 pages
This important book provides a practical guide to the principles and practice of developing an integrated pest management (IPM) programme. Integrated Pest Management answers the question `how do you devise, develop and implement a practical IPM system which will fully meet the real needs of farmers?'. The term `pest' in this book is used in its broadest sense and includes insects, pathogens, weeds, nematodes, etc.
The book commences by outlining the basic principles which underlie pest control (crop husbandry, socio-economics, population ecology and population genetics) and reviews the control mesures available and their use in IPM systems. Subsequent chapters cover the techniques and approaches used in defining a pest problem, programme planning and management, systems analysis, experimental paradigms and implementation of IPM systems. The final seciton of the book contains four chapters giving examples of IPM in different cropping systems, contributed by invited specialists and outlining four different perspectives.
Integrated Pest Management will be of great use to agricultural and plant scientists, entomologists, aracologists and nematologists and all those studying crop protection, particularly at MSc level and above. It will be particularly useful for, and should find a place on the shelves of all personnel within the agrochemical industry, universities and research establishments working in this subject area and as a reference in libraries for students and professionals alike.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Principles of integrated pest management
8
23 Principles of socioeconomics
11
24 Principles of ecology
17
25 Population genetics
25
26 Principles of control
30
References
40
Control measures
47
82 Extension
210
83 Extension methods
211
84 Adoption of IPM
217
85 Implementation of IPM systems
219
References
220
Integrated pest management in olives
222
92 Importance of the crop
223
93 Olive pests
225

33 Hostplant resistance
56
34 Biological control
58
35 Cultural control
66
36 Interference methods
71
References
77
Defining the problem
86
42 Trigger events and funding
87
43 Historical analysis
91
44 Socioeconomic analysis
93
45 Research status analysis
96
46 Goals and strategies
111
References
115
Programme planning and management
120
52 Devisisng an IPM system
121
53 Programme and systems resource requirements
128
54 Organizational structures
132
55 Programme planning and monitoring
137
56 Management and leadershio
140
57 Running the programme
146
References
148
Techniques in systems analysis
152
62 Statistical models
156
63 Mechanistic models
158
64 Rulebased models and expert systems
162
65 Optimization models
164
relative advantages and disadvantages
166
References
167
Experimental paradigms
172
72 Pesticides
173
73 Intercropping
179
74 Hostplant resistance
182
75 Natural enemy theoretical models
188
76 IPM research and development
192
References
198
Implementation of an IPM system
209
94 Pest control and integrated pest management
229
Acknowledgements
237
References
238
Integrated pest management in wheat
241
102 wheat in the UK and The Netherlands
242
103 Wheat in the USA
252
104 Integrated pest management in wheat in the USA
253
biological control successes
267
References
271
Integrated pest management in cotton
280
112 California as an example
282
113 A physiological basis for pest control
285
114 Comparisons of varieties
290
115 The economic threshold
293
116 Economics of demandside pests
295
117 Economics of supplyside pests
299
118 Abiotic effects on compensation
303
119 Discussion
305
References
306
Integrated pest management in protected crops
311
122 Initiation of IPM
312
123 The greenhouse environment
313
124 Emergence of IPM in greenhouses
315
125 The present situation
317
126 Examples of IPM programmes
321
127 New aspects of IPM in protected crops
324
128 How implementation of IPM has been realized
328
129 Factors limiting the introduction of IPM
331
1210 Factors affecting IPM implementation and pesticide use
335
1211 Specific advantages of IPM in protected crops
337
1212 From IPM to integrated farming
338
1213 The future of IPM
340
Acknowledgements
341
Index
345
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 341 - Plant strategies of manipulating predator-prey interactions through allelochemicals: prospects for application in pest control.

Bibliographic information