The Mahávansi, the Rájá-ratnácari, and the Rájá-vali: Forming the Sacred and Historical Books of Ceylon; Also, a Collection of Tracts Illustrative of the Doctrines and Literature of Buddhism, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Parbury, Allen, and Company, 1833 - Buddha (The concept)
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Page xxviii - Genuine Buddhism never seems to contemplate any measures of acceptance with the deity ; but, overleaping the barrier between finite and infinite mind, urges its followers to aspire by their own efforts to that divine perfectibility of which it teaches that man is capable, and by attaining which man becomes God...
Page ix - I felt it to be my duty to submit it, as my official opinion, to his majesty's government, that it was absolutely necessary, in order to secure for the natives of Ceylon a popular and a really efficient administration of justice, to compile, for their separate use, a special code of laws, which at the same time that it was founded upon the universally admitted, and therefore universally applicable, abstract principles of justice, should be scrupulously adapted to the local circumstances of the country,...
Page ix - ... as other sources, the most authentic information that could be obtained relative to the religion, usages, manners, and feelings of the people who professed the Buddhist religion on the island of Ceylon. The priests, after much consideration amongst themselves, and after frequent consultations with their followers in every part of the island, presented to me the copies which I now possess of the Mahavansi, Rajavali, and...
Page viii - Mahavansi, the ßajarali, and the Rajaratnacari. The first is written in the Pali, and the other two in the Singhalese language, and they are all three explanatory of the origin, doctrines, and introduction into the island of Ceylon, of the Buddhist religion. The English translation was a short time ago given by me to Mr. Upham, upon his expressing a with to publish some genuine account of a religion which, whatever may be the nature and tendency of its doctrines, deserves the cnsideration of the...
Page x - I have the honour to be, Gentlemen, your most obedient humble servant, (Signed) FA ZEA.
Page xxxiii - ... true riches of a state. These extraordinary excavations rivalled the most remarkable labours of antiquity, and were hardly surpassed by the kindred wonders of Egypt. The remains of these national monuments demonstrate an amount of population and a state of prosperity infinitely superior to what exists at present, or has for a long period existed, in Ceylon...
Page xxxii - These extraordinary excavations rivalled the most remarkable labours of antiquity, and were hardly surpassed by the kindred wonders of Egypt. The remains of these national monuments demonstrate an amount of population, and a state of prosperity infinitely superior to what exists at present, or has for a long period existed in Ceylon. Not less striking than these lakes are the vast mounds, temples, and mausoleums, which are generally adjacent to their borders, and the remains of which, at this present...
Page ix - Rajaratnacari, as containing, according to the judgment of the best informed of the Buddhist priests on Ceylon, the most genuine account which is extant of the origin of the Budhu religion, of its doctrines, of its introduction into Ceylon, and of the effects, moral and political, which those doctrines had, from time to time, produced upon the conduct of the native government, and upon the manners and usages of the native inhabitants of the country.
Page xii - ... mythological history of Buddhism, and countries professing Buddhism. The Mahavansi is esteemed as of the highest authority, and is undoubtedly very ancient. The copy from which the translation is made is one of the temple copies, from which many things found in common copies are excluded, as not being found in the ancient Pali copies of the work. Every temple I have visited is furnished with a copy of this work, and is usually placed next the Jatakas or incarnations of Buddha.
Page xxi - Dhydni (see note 24), ever made a descent ; that is to say, they were never conceived in mortal womb ; nor had they father or mother: but certain persons of mortal mould have by degrees attained to such excellence of nature and such...

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